National Association of Sports Commissions Raises $14,000 for Oklahoma Cleats for Kid

April 15, 2014

NASC Wraps Up Oklahoma City Meeting with Record Attendance

The National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC), the governing body of the $8.7 billion sports events industry, celebrated record attendance for its annual symposium held here last week.

815 attendees, including 206 first-timers, participated in last week’s NASC Symposium to elect new NASC leadership, honor members with industry awards and participate in dozens of continuing education programs led by industry leadership.

Also, during the event the NASC Sports Legacy Fund raised $14,000 to benefit Oklahoma Cleats for Kids, an Oklahoma City-based organization that collects, recycles and distributes new and gently used athletic shoes and equipment to kids in need.

Cleats for Kids at NASC

National Association of Sports Commissions Board Chair Kevin Smith presents a $14,000 grant to Cleats for Kids’ Stacy McDaniels and youth beneficiaries of the program at the 2014 NASC Symposium held in Oklahoma City last week.

Security Now A Priority for Events

April 14, 2014

No surprise here, the Boston Marathon, more than a month before its 2014 running, announced a number of security changes from the 2013 event that saw the tragic bombing at its finish line.

The Marathon has banned several items from its event, including bags, backpacks, handbags, suitcases and similar items. Not so different from what other events have implemented in the almost year since the Boston bombing, but the severity of the limitations may take some getting used to, since runners often carry their change of clothes in bags that they can check. Many events have gone to clear plastic check bags, and Boston will allow runners to use those clear bags that the Marathon itself gives out.

Boston also is going a step further and prohibiting containers with more than a liter of liquid, costumes covering the face and bulky clothes-vests with pockets, for example.

Here’s what runners can do—they can run with small fanny packs or fuel belts that can carry medication and cell phones, along with a small water bottle.

It’s not just the participants affected by these new restrictions—large flags or signs bigger than 11 x 17 inches are banned from any marathon venue, described as the start and finish areas, the course itself, the athletes’ village and areas where official events are held such as the pasta parties, etc. Signage, for anyone who’s done one of these events, is a big part of the festival atmosphere along the marathon (or half marathon) routes. And don’t count on your son or daughter or Team In Training ‘hero’ to jump in during the last 50 yards to finish the race with you—they’ll be prohibited from doing that as well.

Too much? Too prohibitive? Or a sign of the times. Perhaps a little of all three. Let’s face it, ever since 9/11, security has been on the minds of any event rights holder or venue. The Boston bombing just brought it closer to home and reached out to spectators who were just there to cheer on friends and enjoy the celebratory atmosphere.

I remember my first trip to London, I had a candy wrapper I wanted to throw away and I got agitated when I couldn’t find a trash can to deposit it. It was a few minutes before I realized that getting rid of trash cans was their own security measure. It is a way of life in many European cities, and now it’s becoming a way of life for us here in the states, especially at events that draw thousands of people.

It means extra costs for those putting on the event, but the cost of not increasing security can be hundreds of times more expensive.

Boston Marathon lead pack

Call for Volunteers: 2014-2015 NASC committees and volunteer opportunities

April 10, 2014

Volunteers are the foundation of the NASC. In the last year, more than 100 committee volunteers contributed to progress and growth of the NASC in many ways including:

  • Referring industry colleagues to join the association.
  • Enhancing mentoring activities for new members and first time symposium attendees.
  • Establishing of new categories and serving on judging panels for the annual member awards.
  • Developing of CSEE modules.
  • Recommending educational content and programming for the annual NASC Sports Event Symposium, the original conference and longest-running reverse tradeshow for the sports event industry.

We are excited to invite you to respond to this year’s call for volunteers. We need your skills, passion, and perspectives to build a vibrant, inclusive, and multicultural group of volunteer leaders throughout our committees.
The NASC is YOUR association; committee participation is one of the best ways get engaged and help contribute to the decision-making that continues to position the NASC as the most valuable resource available to sports event
professionals. Members, including new committee members and those who currently serve, must respond to the call for volunteers by April 25, 2014. Volunteer for a committee.

Yours in Sport,
Kevin B. Smith

Chairman, NASC
Director, St. Petersburg/Clearwater Sports Commission

Awards Committee
The Awards Committee is responsible for developing award categories and criteria for the annual NASC Member Awards. The committee also serves as judges for the various categories.
Staff Liaison: Elizabeth Young

Membership Committee
The Membership Committee oversees membership retention and recruitment. The committee contacts inactive and cancelled
members on behalf of the association to encourage them to renew. The committee also evaluates membership benefits an resources on an annual basis.
Staff Liaison: Elizabeth Young

Mentoring Committee
The Mentoring Committee cultivates relationships with new members to help guide them through their first year of
membership. The committee is also responsible for planning and hosting first time attendee activities at the annual Symposium.
Pre-requisites: Committee members must have a minimum of five years of industry experience and be actively involved in
the NASC.
Staff Liaison: Elizabeth Young

Professional Development Committee
The Professional Development Committee assists with the development and implementation of the CSEE Program.
Committee members are required to join and fully participate in monthly committee calls, assist in the development of modules and continually evaluate the program to strengthen the CSEE brand. Pre-requisites: Members must be currently enrolled in
the CSEE Program and have attended at least two modules to be considered.
Staff Liaison: Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM

Sports Legacy Committee
The Sports Legacy Committee manages the Sports Legacy Fund. The committee establishes the criteria and eligibility requirements for beneficiaries of the fund and selects the beneficiary each year. The committee also coordinates all aspects of the annual fundraiser, including promotion, solicitation of donation items, and ticket sales, as well as equipment donations.
Staff Liaison: Elizabeth Young

Symposium Committee
The Symposium Committee assists in the planning and execution of the annual NASC Sports Event Symposium. Committee members
are required to join and fully participate in monthly committee calls, recruit event owners, develop education sessions including review of topics, examination of proposals, and selection of speakers, and promote the Symposium through word of mouth marketing to industry peers and colleagues.

Staff Liaison: Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM

Exceed Your Participants Expectations

April 7, 2014

Despite the quality educational opportunities that are offered at the NASC Symposium, the questions most asked to members are: how did your appointments go? Did you get any leads? Any good RFP’s out there?  In general, the majority of focus is on selling: the rights holders on selling their events to cities and the cities on selling their destination to the right event.

This session looks to change that by focusing on building event partnerships that exceed the expectations of the participants and ultimately increase the ROI of the event for all parties involved.  The goal of the session is to extend the client relationships beyond sales and into the event management process that starts after the contracts are signed and the sales manager for a destination hands over the client to the services manager/ local organizing committee.

The sales/event management turnover process is critical to the success of an event and is a cornerstone to a positive partnership between a destination and an event.  By clearly communicating their expectations and predetermining shared goals for the event, the stakeholders can develop a model where everyone archives success post event.

Beth Porreca, US Lacrosse; John David, USA BMX; Jamie Patrick, Madison Area Sports Commission

National Association of Sports Commissions Names Next Host Cities for Symposiums; NASC Wraps Up Oklahoma City Meeting with Record Attendance, New Board Leadership

April 3, 2014

The National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC), the governing body of the $8.7 billion sports events industry, celebrated record attendance for its annual symposium here this week.

More than 800 attendees, including 170 first-timers, participated in this week’s NASC Symposium to elect new NASC leadership, honor members with industry awards and participate in dozens of continuing education programs led by industry leadership.

Also, during the event the NASC Sports Legacy Fund raised $14,000 to benefit Oklahoma Cleats for Kids, an Oklahoma City-based organization that collects, recycles and distributes new and gently used athletic shoes and equipment to kids in need.

 

NASC Selects Future Host Cities for 2016 and 2017

The NASC also announced future locations for its annual meeting: Grand Rapids, Michigan will be the host in 2016 and Sacramento was named the 2017 host city. Previously announced, Milwaukee will host the 2015 NASC Symposium from April 27-30.

“We feel we have an exciting lineup of cities that will be the hosts for our Symposiums,” said Don Schumacher, executive director of the NASC. “With our return to Milwaukee in 2015, we’ll visit some of our most dynamic sports cities.”

 

NEW NASC Leadership Elected

New NASC board leadership was also announced, including Kevin Smith, CSEE, the director of the St. Petersburg/Clearwater Sports Commission, as the new chair of NASC.

Additional officers include: Vice Chair/Chair Elect, Greg Ayers, CSEE, president & CEO, Discover Kalamazoo; Treasurer, Ralph Morton, CSEE, executive director, Seattle Sports Commission; Secretary, Mike Anderson, CSEE, director of sports, Visit Charlotte; and  Immediate Past Chair, Terry Hasseltine, CSEE, executive director, Maryland Office of Sports.

The slate of NASC directors includes: Board term expiring 2015, Tammy Dunn, CSEE, sports marketing manager, Snohomish County Sports Commission; Greg Fante, CSEE, director of sports development, Louisville Sports Commission; Kindra Fry, CSEE, SMP, vice president of sales and marketing, Bryan-College Station CVB and Nancy Yawn, CSEE, CDME, director, Round Rock CVB.

Directors with Board terms expiring in 2016: John Gibbons, CSEE, executive director, Rhode Island Sports Commission; Michael Price, CSEE, executive director, Greater Lansing Sports Authority; Janis Schmees Burke, CSEE, executive director, Harris County-Houston Sports Authority and Holly Shelton, CSEE, manager of sports business development, Oklahoma City CVB.

Directors with Board terms expiring in 2017: Brian Hickey, CSEE, director of sports, Visit Tallahassee/Tallahassee Sports Council; Janis Ross, executive director, Eugene, Cascades & Coast Sports; Benjamin Wilder, CSEE, director, Savannah Sports Council and Marc Zimmerman, CSEE, sales & events manager, Central Florida’s Polk County Sports Marketing.

Allied representatives with a board term expiring in 2015 include Rick Hatcher, CSEE, director of business development, PSA, and board term expiring in 2016, Mike Hill, CSEE, senior director of sports sales, Hilton Worldwide-Sports Sales. Rights Holder representatives are, with a board term expiring in 2015, Jeff Jarnecke, associate director of championships and alliances, NCAA, and board term expiring in 2016, John David, chief operating officer, USA BMX.

 

NASC Members Honored

Also presented this week were the Member Awards, signifying outstanding work in the field of sports events, marketing and promotion. This year NASC added the prestigious Sports Event Professional of the Year award, honoring the person deemed most influential in Sports Events planning and management. This year’s inaugural Sports Event Professional of the Year award goes to Ron Radigonda, recently retired as executive director of Amateur Softball Association/USA Softball.

Other award winners include:

  • Locally Created Event of the Year, under $200,000 budget; Hampton Roads Sports Commission
  • Locally Created Event of the Year, $200,000 budget and above; Kansas City Sports Commission
  • Marketing Campaign of the Year, $200,000 budget and above; Round Rock CVB
  • Sports Commission of the Year, under $200,000 budget; Erie Sports Commission
  • Sports Commission of the Year, $200,000 budget and above, Harris County-Houston Sports Commission
  • Sports Tourism Organization of the Year, under $200,000 budget; Butler County Visitors Bureau

The NASC this week also recognized its latest class of graduates in its Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) continuing education program. The Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 CSEE graduates include: Cissy Aberg, Plano Convention and Visitors Bureau; Christopher Ackerman, Pennsylvania Dutch Convention & Visitors Bureau; John David, USA BMX; Katie Fencl, Des Moines Area Sports Commission; Michael Guswiler, West Michigan Sports Commission; Scott Hofmann, Warren County Convention & Visitors Bureau; Meaghan Hughes, Ann Arbor Area Convention & Visitors Bureau; Matthew Libber, Elite Tournaments; Leah Mitcham, Mooresville Convention and Visitors Bureau; Jason Philbeck, Greater Raleigh Sports Alliance; Beth Porreca, US Lacrosse and Meghan Ziehmer, Greater Lansing Sports Authority.

NASC Announces 2014 Member Award Winners

April 3, 2014

Kansas City award photoThe NASC Member Awards signify outstanding work in the areas of sports events, marketing and promotion. All entries were reviewed by a panel of peers in the association and judged based on the criteria listed for each category. Winners were then announced at the NASC Symposium in Oklahoma City, where more than 800 sports tourism professionals were in attendance.

Award winners include:

  • Inaugural Sports Event Professional of the Year award, Ron Radigonda, recently retired as head of the Amateur Softball Harris County Houston award photoAssociation/USA Softball
  • Locally Created Event of the Year, under $200,000 budget, Hampton Roads Sports Commission
  • Locally Created Event of the Year, $200,000 budget and above, Kansas City Sports Commission
  • Marketing Campaign of the Year, $200,00 budget and above, Round Rock CVB
  • Sports Commission of the Year, under $200,000 budget, Erie Sports Commission
  • Sports Commission of the Year, $200,000 budget and above, Harris County-Houston Sports Commission

For more information on the NASC Member Awards program, visit: www.sportscommissions.org/About/Member-Awards.

Grand Rapids Named Host of 2016, Sacramento Named Host of 2017, National Association of Sports Commissions Sports Event Symposium

April 3, 2014

2016 Logo for NASC

 

The host cities for the 2016 and 2017 NASC Symposium were announced at the NASC Symposium held this week in Oklahoma City. The  24th NASC Sports Event Symposium will be held April 3-7, 2016 in Grand Rapids and the 25th anniversary Symposium will be March 26-30, 2017 in Sacramento.

The 23rd annual Symposium is scheduled for April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI.

2017 logo for NASC

The Request for Proposals (RFP) for the 2018 and 2019 NASC Sports Event Symposium will be released on the final day of the Oklahoma City Symposium.

Visit www.nascsymposium.com for more details.

 

 

 

Leading Highly Effective Teams

March 31, 2014

The board retreat was going pretty much as planned.  Lively conversation centered on the organization’s mission, goals, and objectives.  I was doing what I do. Facilitating, keeping them concise and on target.  All of a sudden two members began questioning each other on their motives for being on the board and the possibility that one member was behaving unethically.

I quickly switched from a facilitator role to that of a mediator.  We adjourned and only the disputants and I spent the next hour working on the issues at hand.

Once I had the “fire” squelched somewhat, we took a break.  One of the other board members came up to me and said, “I guess we should have warned you that those two have a history”.  Yes, that would’ve been nice.

So, why do some teams perform magnificently and others appear dysfunctional?  All of these individuals are competent, skillful, and professional.  They all achieve their objectives and are accountable.  They receive the highest marks on individual employee evaluations.  So, why can’t they “just get along”?

Attend my session and find out the answers and the ultimate outcome of this situation.

By:  Dr. Mac McCrory

Economic Impact Calculator

March 24, 2014

Properly assessing the economic impact of sporting events you host within your community is a key aspect to helping your organization strategically determine several things.  Whether to pursue an event, whether to bring an event back, and whether the event provides your local tourism industry a meaningful boost.

The NASC Calculator aims to provide users a tool for gathering a rough first-approximation of the potential economic impact that an event has upon your community.  As such, the primary purpose of the session is to further educate users how to navigate the Calculator in practice.

Additionally, a secondary goal of this session is to educate users how to design and implement on-site spectator surveys.  The recommended approach for using the Calculator is to gather event-specific data regarding how visitors spend money at hotels, restaurants, and more…as well as gather information on where they are from.  Thus, the presentation will yield insight into best practices for implementing on-site surveys.

TSE Consulting – Relationship Between Host cities and International Sports Federations

March 17, 2014

In 2013, TSE Consulting, in conjunction with Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, conducted a worldwide independent study that focused on the relationship between host cities and international sports federations. The primary motivation was to determine the true level of partnership between cities that stage important events and the rights-holding organizations that grant them the privilege to do so.

While major international cities and international sports federations may seem to be very different from American cities and domestic sport organizations, TSE found the parallels to be strikingly similar. More than 100 cities were surveyed, and there were many interesting – perhaps, surprising – results that can be useful for both host cities and sports organizations alike.

While the study was beginning to return significant results, TSE was retained by USA Diving to assist its bid process for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Diving Trials. This engagement enabled TSE to try some new ideas based upon survey results, and to create a “best practices” model for a bid process conduced by a sports organization rights holder.

At the same time, the USA Diving assignment allowed us to chronicle the perceptions of cities – what they liked, what they didn’t, and how to ensure that bid cities are best able to realize their hopes and expectations from their investment in the process.

Clearly, rights holders can improve the bid process, the events that are offered, and communication, while host cities expressed a desire to be viewed as a partner, to expect that city goals be understood, and cities have the ability to form long-term relationships. Lars Haue-Pedersen and Dale Neuburger will co-resent this session, which has equal value for cities and event rights holders.


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