Upcoming NASC Webinar Schedule – Register Now

July 29, 2015

We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below and reserve your spot today!



National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Mark Krug, Assistant Executive Director, NJCAA, as he discusses the National Junior College Athletic Association and what it takes to land their events. Recently, NJCAA uploaded RFP’s to our Event RFP Database for 15 different events with multiple years available. If you haven’t checked these out, be sure to do so! There will be time at the end of the webinar for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 4th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



US Corporate Games

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Kurt Aichele, CEO US Corporate Games, as he discusses US Corporate Games and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 18th, remember you can download the webinar recording from the webinar archives page on http://www.sportscommissions.org.



Utilizing Social Media for Events

Best Practices Webinar
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jackie Reau, CEO, Game Day Communications, as she discusses best practices for utilizing social media for events. If you are unable to join us on the 26th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Finding funding: Sometimes it comes to you

July 28, 2015

So you have a great idea for a new event for your facility: It would bring in hundreds of athletes who would stay multiple days and bring in thousands of dollars to the local economy.

Or, you’d like to expand your facility, adding fields or courts, which would allow you to bring in bigger, better events. All sounds good, but the bottom line, as they say, is the bottom line: How to pay for all of this?

It’s a universal issue that all organizations, rights holders, facility operators, high school and college athletic departments or team managers face. You may have great ideas, but you don’t have the resources to fund them. Where does the money come from?

As a sports corporation or CVB, you might ask your sales staff to acquire more sponsorships or partnerships. (what your sales staff says after you leave the room, well, that’s out of our control)

We already know that more colleges and universities, especially those outside the “Power Five” conferences, are looking to beer sales at games to help fund the athletic department. A year ago, there were 21 on-campus football stadiums where any fan of legal age could grab a brew. That’s more than twice as many as five years ago.

Troy University Athletic Director John Hartwell estimated that beer would account for $200,000 in commissions for the season. According to its contract with concessionaire Sodexo, Troy receives 43 percent of gross beer sales at its 30,000-seat stadium, or better than $2 for every $5 beer.

But sometimes the money comes to you, through an endowment. A trend that started in the Ivy League and spread to other schools is now becoming the new way to save that school from paying a salary.

The most recent example? Richard Corbett, a Florida real-estate executive who served as the business manager of Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign, gave $35 million to the University of Notre Dame, from which he graduated in 1960.

Of the total, $25 million will go for a new building to house the anthropology and psychology departments and a digital-media center. He also directed $10 million of the gift to endow the university’s head football coach position.

In another case, Xavier’s men’s basketball coach, Chris Mack, is now the Sedler Family Men’s Head Basketball Coach after Tom and Genny Sedler provided Xavier with the endowment to fund Coach Mack’s salary. The endowment basically allows the university to take the money that would go to salaries and use it somewhere else.

The academic side has been doing this for decades, as donors have funded the “so-and-so-chair for chemical engineering research” at universities around the country. So how can you get the endowment idea to work for you?

It might come in the form of a civic-minded philanthropist who wants to fund a new soccer or basketball complex, or a company that can use foundation dollars to help a community cause while getting its name out in public.

This is a time we all have to be creative to find sponsorship and partnership dollars. Doing a form of an endowment might be the way to get your project from the drawing board, into the community.

ball field

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now

July 21, 2015

We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below and reserve your spot today!



USA Badminton

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, July 22, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jon Schmeider as he discusses USA Badminton and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Ways to Ensure a High Return on your Membership Investment

Best Practices Webinar
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Elizabeth Young, Director of Membership & Marketing, NASC, as she shares the top 5 NASC membership benefits that can help you get your share of the sports tourism industry. She will discuss how to ensure a high return on your NASC membership investment and answer any questions you may have about benefits and services available to your organization as a member of NASC. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Mark Krug, Assistant Executive Director, NJCAA, as he discusses the National Junior College Athletic Association and what it takes to land their events. Recently, NJCAA uploaded RFP’s to our Event RFP Database for 15 different events with multiple years available. If you haven’t checked these out, be sure to do so! There will be time at the end of the webinar for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 4th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



US Corporate Games

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Kurt Aichele, CEO US Corporate Games, as he discusses US Corporate Games and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 18th, remember you can download the webinar recording from the webinar archives page on http://www.sportscommissions.org.



Utilizing Social Media for Events

Best Practices Webinar
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jackie Reau, CEO, Game Day Communications, as she discusses best practices for utilizing social media for events. If you are unable to join us on the 26th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

How many sports should my child play?

July 20, 2015

Whether you’re a rights holder or a parent, you probably live and breathe youth sports nearly 24/7. And the discussion always is there: Should kids play more than one sport, or should young athletes concentrate on the sport in which they excel?

The Wichita Eagle recently published an interesting look at youth sports and participation. First, the bottom line: According to the Sports Facility Advisory, there were 53 million youngsters (and their parents) traveling to youth sporting events in this country last year, with an economic impact of $7 billion.

That’s the economic total, now let’s look at the ‘why’ we have our kids participate. The article quotes Marilyn Price-Mitchell, a Seattle-based psychologist identified as a positive youth development expert. “Sports teach kids about tactics and strategy,” she said. “It teaches them about working with a team, how to collaborate with other kids.”

So we know that sports teaches our kids great life lessons. But let’s face it, we often hope that their favorite sports will help them earn a college scholarship. Here’s a sobering fact: The NCAA says $2.7 billion in athletic scholarships that Division I and II schools give out, go to more than 150,000 students each year. Sounds like a lot, until you realize that total is just two percent of high school athletes.

And the article points out that specializing in one sport doesn’t guarantee a college signing. “Many think a college scholarship in athletics is a given,” Newman University women’s basketball coach Darin Spence said. “Just because you pay some club coach money, that doesn’t mean your child will earn a scholarship.”

Programs often can offer only partial scholarships as well. Baseball, for example, usually reserves full rides to pitchers. NCAA Division I baseball programs give out 11.7 scholarships per team, so most players receive partial scholarships.

Bottom line is, we know that youth sports are a great, healthy activity for kids. For event holders and site managers, we also know that youth sports are a growing business. But none of us should lose sight of the reasons why we’re involved in youth sports: For the kids. Overwhelmingly, coaches responding to The Eagle’s survey said youth sports need to be about learning and loving the game.

“Parents must be patient,” Joe Auer, boys basketball and golf coach at Heights High, said. “I see a lot of kids get burned out on sports because by 10, 11, they’re told the reason they’re playing is to get to the next level. You can get better without taking the fun out of it.”

Wichita Eagle

Photo courtesy Fernando Salazar, Wichita Eagle

Communication is the Key

July 13, 2015

It may be summertime where you are, but in sports you know you’re always planning a season (or more) ahead. I was reminded of that this week, when a local high school sent out a letter to parents and boosters regarding this year’s football season. Some of the points in the letter are applicable not just for football, but for all youth sports. Some excerpts:

  • “Each coach will hold a USA Football Heads Up Certification and will instruct with positive feedback, excitement, fun and plenty of repetition for every player. Our philosophy is kids will not get better standing on the sideline.”
  • “Each parent will be asked to contribute a small amount of time to help our league put together an organization we can all be proud of. We will not be successful in giving our kids the experience they deserve unless everyone takes some personal interest in the success of the league.”
  • “Our mission is to get kids on the field and provide them with a safe and fun atmosphere to display their efforts and talent….we want our sport to be available to anyone that wishes to participate so there are three ways (to) pay the..registration. Another option is scholarship. No one…that wishes to play football will be denied that opportunity based on finances.”

There are some good points in that letter, including having coaches properly trained, asking parents to get involved and making sure everyone participates, regardless of their ability to pay. And isn’t that what we want for all our kids, no matter what sport they may want to play?

Youth-football-003

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now!

July 9, 2015

We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below and reserve your spot today!



Selling Local Sponsorships – A perspective from both the buyer and seller’s side

Best Practices Webinar
Monday, July 13, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

This is a webinar you won’t want to miss. Join Tom Gamble, President & CEO, In-Game Sports, as he shares tips on finding sponsors for your local sporting events. He will also provide examples on activating sop once they are secured. Elisa Cappella, Marketing Brand Manager, First Financial Bank, will join Tom to provide her perspective from the buyers side. She will discuss what she looks for when purchasing a sponsorship, how she evaluates ROI and what has worked best for her in the past. If you can’t join us on the 13th, you can still access the webinar from our webinar archives page at www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).


US Lacrosse
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Beth Porreca, Director – Special Events, US Lacrosse, as she discusses US Lacrosse and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 14th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



USA Badminton

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, July 22, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jon Schmeider as he discusses USA Badminton and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Ways to Ensure a High Return on your Membership Investment

Best Practices Webinar
Wednesday, July 29, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Elizabeth Young, Director of Membership & Marketing, NASC, as she shares the top 5 NASC membership benefits that can help you get your share of the sports tourism industry. She will discuss how to ensure a high return on your NASC membership investment and answer any questions you may have about benefits and services available to your organization as a member of NASC. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Mark Krug, Assistant Executive Director, NJCAA, as he discusses the National Junior College Athletic Association and what it takes to land their events. Recently, NJCAA uploaded RFP’s to our Event RFP Database for 15 different events with multiple years available. If you haven’t checked these out, be sure to do so! There will be time at the end of the webinar for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 4th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Utilizing Social Media for Events

Best Practices Webinar
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jackie Reau, CEO, Game Day Communications, as she discusses best practices for utilizing social media for events. If you are unable to join us on the 26th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Tulsa Celebrates Championship Doubleheader

July 6, 2015

July will be a big month for the Tulsa Sports Commission, as the city will be the host for two national championship tournaments at the same time later this month.

The USGA Girls’ Junior Championship will be held at the Tulsa Country Club starting July 20th, while the US Youth Soccer National Championships will start a day later at the Mohawk Sports Complex.

This will be the third USGA championship conducted at Tulsa Country Club, and the 22nd championship held in the state of Oklahoma. The club previously was the host for the 1960 U.S. Women’s Amateur, won by JoAnne Gunderson Carner, and the 2008 USGA Senior Women’s Amateur, won by Diane Lang.

Add them all up, and the Tulsa Sports Commission will be bringing in 35 events this year, with six of them national championships. For these two national championships, the planning started well ahead of time. Tulsa Country Club was awarded the Girls’ Junior Championship in July of 2013, while the Sports Commission bid on the soccer tournament two years ago.

While the city will be busy, Heath Aucion, director of operations for the Tulsa Sports Commission, told the Tulsa Fox station that everyone is ready. “Hotels are okay, communication (about the events) is out, so people know there’s going to be a lot of people in town.”

And, the bottom line is, as we all know, the bottom line. The soccer championship is expected to have an economic impact of $5.7 million, while the golf championship is estimated to have a $750,000 economic impact. While the financial impact is important, it’s also a great opportunity for Tulsa to show off its facilities, and its city, to visitors. All 96 soccer teams participating in the tournament are from outside Tulsa, and all but six of the 156 golfers in the USGA event are from outside Oklahoma.

Landing the big events is one thing: Getting the word out that there will be big events, is another thing. Tulsa has made sure its partners know that it’s their time to shine on a big sports stage.

Tulsa Country Club

Helicopter Parenting, Celebrity Style

July 2, 2015

We may find out this week whether Sean “Diddy” Combs will be charged by the district attorney after his dustup last week with the UCLA football strength and conditioning coach.

In an incident that someone said was “helicopter parenting by a parent who actually owns a helicopter,” Diddy got into a fight with Bruins coach Sal Alosi after the coach screamed at Diddy’s son, Justin, on the practice field.

Now, no one likes to see their child get screamed at, so Diddy allegedly confronted the coach in his office and he was 1)either defending himself from the coach’s threats or 2)threw a kettlebell weight at the coach during the argument. Diddy’s arrest includes three counts of assault with a deadly weapon, one count of making terrorist threats and one count of battery. There is said to be surveillance video of the incident, so more should be known soon.

A bit of background: If Sal Alosi’s name sounds familiar, it should, because he was an assistant with the New York Jets almost five years ago when he tripped a Miami Dolphins player as he was running down the sidelines covering a punt.

As for Justin combs, he’s a redshirt junior defensive back for the Bruins and has played a handful of games during his UCLA career. UCLA is becoming the program of choice for rap star’s sons: Snoop Dogg’s son just signed with the Bruins this year.

You don’t have to have been around youth sports long to see verbal confrontations between parents and coaches, during and after games. Who is at fault for what in this particular incident has yet to be sorted out, but it’s not unique in youth sports and it’s a big reason kids say they leave sports in their early teen years.

A coach’s job is to make that young player the best he or she can be. A parent’s job is to be as supportive as possible. And let’s think about what the atmosphere in that locker room is going to be when – or if – Justin Combs returns to the UCLA program.

Upcoming NASC Event Webinars – Register Today

June 24, 2015

We have a great line-up of Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below and reserve your spot today!

NXT Sports Inc.
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Monday, June 29, 2015
11:30am – 12:30pm ET

Register Now

Join Robin Baxter, Vice President of Events, NXT Sports Inc., as she discusses NXT Sports and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 29th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).


The Biggest Loser RunWalk
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
2:30pm – 3:30pm ET

Register Now

Join Christina Morlock, Director of Marketing and Public Relations, as she discussed The Biggest Loser RunWalk and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 1st, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).


USA Badminton
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, July 22, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Jon Schmeider as he discusses USA Badminton and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).


National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Mark Krug, Assistant Executive Director, NJCAA, as he discusses the National Junior College Athletic Association and what it takes to land their events. Recently, NJCAA uploaded RFPs to our Event RFP Database for 15 different events with multiple years available. If you haven’t checked these out, be sure to do so! There will be time at the end of the webinar for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 4th, remember you can download a recording of the presentation on the webinar archives page of www.SportsCommissions.org (login required).


Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars or would like to view them again, visit our webinar archives.

Attitudes sometimes need adjusting

June 22, 2015

As much as we focus on youth sports events and facilities, it’s good to, every once in a while, talk about the players themselves who participate in athletics, sometimes year-round.

Youth basketball

Photo Credit: Greater Cincinnati Sports Corporation

A recent article on theseason.gc.com by Tori Benavidez, a former softball player at Sam Houston State, now an associate softball coach there, brings that focus back to the players. The article puts a lot of the responsibility of developing and keeping players in the game at the feet of the coaches in her article, “Five Components of a Positive Culture.” Those include:

Attitude: A positive attitude, she says, helps the entire team grow. “Eventually those with a negative attitude will start standing out, and it will be your responsibility to correct this issue,” she says.

Mindset: “Athletes constantly go through ups and downs,” says Tori, “but those who are successful are the ones whose failures do not faze them.”

Reinforcement: Positive reinforcement, Tori says, should follow positive effort, while on the other hand, “negative reinforcement should always follow extreme habits that you want to eliminate from your team’s culture.”

Perseverance: Because in sports, most of the time you fail more than you succeed, Tori says it’s important to instill perseverance. “Perseverance makes a player a go-getter rather than someone who sits back and watches everything unfold,” she says. “Your culture should always consist of fighting, battling and giving it your all to achieve your stated goals.”

Passion: Finally, Tori says, if you have the luxury, choose players with passion. “Those passionate players will constantly give it their all, and you want that imitated in your culture.”

Those are attributes to follow not only in sports, but also in life. Great coaches instill those lessons that last a lifetime, both on and off the field and the courts.


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