Archive for January, 2014

Deadline to Submit Entries For NASC Member Awards and Board Nominations is January 31st

January 30, 2014

As a reminder, all member awards entries and board nominations are due on Friday, January 31, 2014. Contact Elizabeth Chaney Young, Director of Membership and Marketing, with any questions about member awards or board nominations.

ImageMember Awards

The annual NASC Member Awards recognize the achievements of Active category members in the previous calendar year. For the 2014 Member Awards, activities, events, marketing campaigns, web strategies, etc. must have occurred in 2013.

Click on the each award category to view judging criteria and submission guidelines.

Entries must be received by Friday, January 31, 2014. Submit an Entry.

ImageCall for Nominations

The NASC Nominating Committee is in the process of nominating six (6) new board members for 2014-2015 term (four (4) Active member representatives, one (1) Allied member representative, and one (1) Rights Holder member representative).  The nominating committee is also in the process of nominating one (1) person who has served on the Board of Directors to serve as Secretary.

NASC Board of Directors Job Description

Nominating Committee Guidelines

Nominations must be received by Friday, January 31, 2014.   Complete nomination form.

SportAccord Convention Scheduled for April 6-11, 2014, The Susesi Resort, Belek/Antalya, Turkey

January 30, 2014

What is SportAccord Convention?

SportAccord Convention is the annual platform in which over 100 international sport federations meet face to face with potential host cities of their international events.

“SportAccord Convention helped London secure the 2017 IAAF World Championships, and secure the 2013 ITU Grand Final… SportAccord Convention enables people to come together and helps secure future events for London.” (Ian Edmondson, Head of Major Events, London & Partners)

Who attends SportAccord Convention?

  • Over 100 International Sport Federations
  • Sporting host cities from all over the world
  • Major Event Organizing Committees (incl. Olympic Games)
  • Leading event delivery organizations


Why should I attend SportAccord Convention?

  • Meet face to face with the decision makers in international sport, discuss hosting opportunities for your city
  • Host over 50 meetings with targeted sport federations over the space of one week
  • Learn and share knowledge with other successful sport cities
  • Meet with organisations who can assist your city deliver outstanding events
  • Position your city at the heart of the sports movement


Useful Links

Partners

Exhibitors

Event Schedule

Conference

Testimonials

City Listings

Register Now

If your city is serious about hosting international sport, you can’t miss SportAccord Convention. Cities from all over the world participate at SportAccord Convention every year in order to achieve their yearly hosting objectives.

Should you wish to discuss any aspect of SportAccord Convention further, please do not hesitate to contact Tim Kilpatrick (tim.kilpatrick@sportaccordconvention.com).

Is the Super Bowl a Super Win for the Hosts?

January 30, 2014

The Super Bowl has long been seen as the big ‘get’ for any host city. With international exposure, out of town visitors and spending all week, it looks to be a no-brainer event.

For the upcoming Super Bowl XLVIII, it’s estimated the game and ancillary events will mean a half billion dollars to the greater New York metropolitan area, according to the Sport Management Research Institute. The New York/New Jersey Super Bowl Host Committee says the economic impact is estimated to be between $500 million and $600 million for the region, including hotels, restaurants, bars, taxis, car services and small businesses.

Now, most sources think those estimates are pie in the sky, at best. A more historical look at the spending comes from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Over the last 12 years the actual direct spending for Super Bowls has been between $113 million and $202 million for each game.

“The true economic impact comes from visitors only, with no spending by locals included except staging costs for the game and ancillary events. These expenses are incurred solely to meet the needs of the event, so it is spending above what would otherwise take place. The displacement theory (crowding out) is a bigger factor in a warm weather site, where visits for non-game purposes could come close to or even match those for the game,” said Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director of NASC.

For Indianapolis and its Super Bowl XLVI, a report by Rockport Analytics shows that more than 116,000 non-residents came to Indiana’s capital for the game and other events. Indianapolis non-residents brought in more than 472,000 visitor days in the metro area (how many visitors would otherwise come to Indy in the middle of winter?). Hotel occupancy averaged 93% for the area, 99% for downtown.

Visitors to Indy spent more than $264 million on the local economy, averaging nearly $571 per person, per day. All totaled, gross spending total economic impacts of Super Bowl XLVI was an estimated $324 million, broken down to $176 million in direct impact, $67 million in indirect impact and $81 million in income. With Indianapolis keeping $324 million of the $384 million in Super Bowl-initiated spending, about 84 cents of every dollar spent, stayed in Indianapolis. No wonder Indy is bidding again for the 2018 game.

Another factor to include is that economic impact studies on an event as big as a Super Bowl focuses on economic activity created by the game, and not economic activity prevented by the game. Victor Matheson, a sports economist at the College of Holy Cross puts it this way: “They don’t do a very good job measuring how many people are crowded away from the metropolitan area during that weekend because, you know, no one in their right mind goes to the Super Bowl city during Super Bowl weekend unless they’re there for the game,” he said. “Which means any regular business that normally would have happened gets crowded out.”

This Super Bowl also is unique is that it crosses state lines. It’s expected that New York City will get the big spenders who’ll stay in Manhattan, the New Jersey hotels and the service industry will benefit, including local restaurants and limo services.

Will it be a half billion dollar infusion into the area economy? Whatever the dollar figure, it’s invaluable in the halo effect (and media attention) the area has, now that it can call itself a “Super Bowl host.”

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications

700 West Pete Rose Way

Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office

(513) 708-5822, mobile

(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com

http://www.gamedaypr.com

LinkedIn: JackieReau

Facebook: JackieReau

Twitter:@JackieReau

Cast Your Net Out for New Sports Revenue

January 27, 2014

Looking for a new event to bring participants, fans and families to your region?

Look no further than your nearest body of water.

A report released by the American Sportfishing Association (ASA), the trade association representing the sportfishing industry, shows that the number of anglers has increased 11 percent over the last six years, and fishing tackle sales grew more than 16 percent. Times that by the 60 million fishermen and women in the United States, and that’s a group carrying some powerful economic impact.

And this doesn’t include the many fishing tournaments held around the country. This is the family, packing up the rods and reels, or a group of buddies hitching up the boat and driving to the nearest lake.

Here’s how ASA President and CEO Mike Nussman sees it: “As an industry, we are keenly aware of the impact that sportfishing has on this nation’s economy, Just by enjoying a day on the water, men, women and children across the United States pump billions of dollars into this country’s economy.”

A closer look at the numbers from this report shows just how strong this impact is.

America’s nearly 60 million anglers are estimated to spend $46 billion per year on fishing equipment, transportation, lodging and other expenses associated with their sport. With a total annual economic impact of $115 billion, fishing supports more than 828,000 jobs and generates $35 billion in wages and $15 billion in federal and state taxes.

Even during the recession years, fishing, seen to be a relatively affordable sport, still saw spending on tackle, travel and the like, grow around five percent.

In Canada, a 2010 study of Nova Scotia’s fishing business showed that fishing generated $58 million in direct spending that year, with an economic impact of $85.6 million each year. What may be more impressive, Nova Scotia had more than 57,000 licensed anglers that year-14,466 of them were youth, showing that fishing is growing its own sustainable base for the future.

And fishing is seen as a true family pastime. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, fishing as a leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing basketball or softball, skateboarding, jogging or hiking.

Take the economic impact of fishing and outdoor sports one step further: A Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World store being built in Round Rock, Texas for a 2015 opening, is expected to bring in nearly $400 million in taxable sales during its first decade of operation—both within the store and at surrounding businesses. The net benefit for Round Rock, according to the city, could total more than $5 million during the same period.

At the same time, Bass Pro Shops is planning a store in North Charleston, with the expectation that the store will bring in at least 35 percent of its visitors from at least 50 miles from the South Carolina location.

In Lone Tree, Colorado, another fishing and outdoor store, Cabela’s, is expected to mean about a $24 million economic impact to Douglas County.

So whether it’s on ice, from a boat or on the shore, fishing can mean a big economic catch for your region.

In remembrance: John A. ‘Jack’ Hughes, Jan. 21, 1947 – Jan. 23, 2014

January 23, 2014

The NASC is very sorry to announce the death of Jack Hughes, past chairman of the NASC Board of Directors. Jack was an integral leader in the sports tourism industry and will be deeply missed by everyone who had the pleasure to know and work with him.

After a brief and courageous battle with cancer, Jack passed away in his sleep on January 23, 2014 at Haven Hospice in Gainesville, Florida with his loving and dedicated wife Janice at his bedside. Please keep his family in your prayers and thoughts during this difficult time.

A Memorial Service will be at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church at 10am on Saturday, January 25th.

Jack’s wish was to send your support to the Gainesville Fisher House, in lieu of flowers:

Gainesville Fisher House
5106 NW 8th Ave
Gainesville, FL 32605
352-514-9761

Image

The NASC Executive Committee and Staff at Columbus Blue Jackets game in January 2006. Front row (l to r): Lori Gamble, Beth Hecquet, and Linda Logan. Back row (l to r): Bill Hanson, Rick Hatcher, Jack Hughes, and Don Schumacher.

PartnerShip Shipping Supplies Offer Big Savings

January 22, 2014

Members of NASC can purchase shipping supplies at discounted prices normally reserved for large companies thanks to the PartnerShip shipping supply ordering service.  This service allows customers to buy basic shipping supplies, including boxes, mailers, packaging tape, and tape guns – all with small order sizes and reduced prices on the easy-to-use PartnerShip.com website.

PartnerShip stocks the most commonly-used shipping materials, including:

  • 10 different durable box styles and sizes
  • 3 different muscle-pack mailer sizes
  • Packaging tape guns
  • 6 and 24-packs of tape rolls
  • Flexible, corrugated folders (great for books)

This tip is brought to you by PartnerShip®, the company that manages the NASC Shipping Program. For more information or to enroll, email sales@PartnerShip.com or call 800-599-2902.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS TO C.L.O.S.E. SALES

January 22, 2014

You’ve been tasked to generate more revenue by management,  think you’ve done everything possible to get more business and you just don’t know what else to do. The solution is based in common sense …  you can improvise your way to more money.  Yes, it’s that simple. We all have the innate abilities to improvise – to think quickly in the moment, to actively listen, to keenly observe and mirror people and to make others look good by solving their problems. These are the same skills that improv actors use on stage for entertainment purposes to create comedy without a script based on audience suggestions.

When it comes to improv comedy, many people say “I could never do that. I’m not that fast on my feet.”  And the reality is that everyone CAN do (improvise) it. Just like improv comedy, life doesn’t come with a script and that includes life in the business world.  EVERYBODY can get on the “stage” of business and perform. Improvising requires exercising a strong muscle – the brain. When we exercise the brain muscle we improve our skills to think quickly, listen better and be more creative. It takes practice (yes, practice) and is attainable to all.

One of the most important outcomes of having strong improv skills is the ability to create relationships. If you want to generate more revenue you need to create, nurture and maintain authentic relationships.  Bluntly, every business relationship in your life is worth money and when you switch your mindset from “selling” to “making friends”, everything related to selling gets so much easier. Ultimately you’ll begin to hear more “yes” than “no” from prospects and clients because people like to do business with people they like and trust as experts. And typically we trust our “friends” the most.

The quickest way to authentically build profitable relationships is to tap into your innate improv skills.  “Practicing” improv (and exercising your brain) will result in five key requirements to building relationships that C.L.O.S.E™ sales:

  1.  Connecting through Commonality   
  2.  Listening Actively
  3. Observing Behavior and Non-Verbal Communications
  4. Seeking Opportunities to Serve Others & Solve Problems     
  5. Empathizing

You can learn more about how to C.L.O.S.E.™ more sales by attending Gina Trimarco Cligrow’s session Building Relationships to C.L.O.S.E.™ Sales

By Gina Trimarco Cligrow
Carolina Improv Company
Gina & Company Coaching & Consulting 

Gina Trimarco Cligrow is owner and founder of Carolina Improv Company and Gina & Company Coaching & Consulting, with 20+ years of experience in sales, marketing, tourism, entertainment, training and operations. http://www.GinaAndCompany.com

Playing the Game of Social Media Marketing

January 21, 2014

Are you getting stressed out by the pressure to be using social media? Are you confused about what is worth doing in social media and how to do it right? Then it is time for you to take a breath and join Author and Social Media Expert; Doug Motel in Playing the Game of Social Media Marketing. Doug will show you how to market your business with the top social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube and more. Some of the things you will take away from this webinar are:

-What social media is and what it isn’t. 
-Why social media platforms are vital for small businesses.
-Tips & tricks for effectively using each platform for your business.
-Strategies to avoid overload when using this stuff. 
-And much, much more. 

Learn how to more effectively use social media platforms to keep your customers engaged and satisfied, giving you more time to focus on what you love to do most in your business!

Time: Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Date: 2:00pm ET
Presenter: Doug Motel
Register Now!

Want more information on upcoming Best Practice and Event Webinars, check out our upcoming webinar schedule here.

Don’t Depend on Ticket Sales for a Successful Event

January 20, 2014

The first weekend of NFL playoffs saw down-to-the-wire, thrilling games in three of the four contests. It also saw something unusual – a scramble to sell out the first-round playoff games.

In Indianapolis, Cincinnati and, of all places, Green Bay, clubs scrambled, pleaded and cajoled their fan bases to buy tickets to assure sellouts and thus avoid the NFL mandated media market blackouts. To no one’s surprise, enough corporate buyers turned out at the last minute to assure the games would be shown in the home teams’ market.

If nothing else, the scramble for a sellout, and the subsequent publicity surrounding the difficulty to sell tickets, has shone a light on the now-antiquated NFL blackout rule. In fact, Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown has called on the Federal Communications Commission to eliminate the Sports Blackout Rule, which was instituted in 1973.

Now, many believe that rule has outlived its usefulness, mainly because the NFL now enjoys the richest television contracts in sports—in 2011 the NFL announced a nine-year extension to its TV packages with Fox, NBC and CBS, under which, according to Forbes, the networks are expected to pay about 60% more than under the old contract.

The new deal, which kicks in after the 2013 season, means the networks will pay about $3 billion a year to show games. Throw in deals with the NFL Network, DirectTV and Westwood One, among others, and NFL teams will split nearly $7 billion in media money per year starting in 2014. That’s more than $200 million per team before a ball hits the turf, no matter who’s blacked out where.

The second reason the blackout rule has seen its time come and go: Ticket sales are an archaic measure of fan support.

It has long been the belief, if a city’s fans won’t buy lots of tickets, they must not be loyal fans. In this day of social media connections, 70” flat screen televisions and RedZone updates, just the opposite is true. Fans are SO involved (especially those who play in fantasy leagues) they want to know what everyone is doing in the league, not just their own team. They’re bigger fans than ever, not just of their team, but of the sport overall.

So what does that mean for an event that you want to bring to your region? Just this: Yes, you want people to attend, and if you bring in a sport or an event that has lots of local participants, all the better to bring in attendees and volunteers. But don’t think you’re going to reach your budget goals by selling $5 tickets to a soccer tournament.

You might have one of the top golf participation areas in the nation, but hold a junior golf tournament in your city and you might find out that you can’t sell tickets. It’s not that people don’t love to watch golf, they love to PLAY golf – usually at the same times your junior tournament is being held.

Or maybe you want people to sample your event—watch youth lacrosse for the first time, for example. What better way to encourage people to stop by than to offer free admission.

During the deep freeze of January 2014, the University of Cincinnati women’s basketball program offered free admission to its game with Rutgers, with complimentary hot chocolate and coffee (courtesy of Coach Jamelle Elliott) for those who braved sub-freezing temperatures to come out. The attendance that night was almost twice what a midweek game usually averages.

The bottom line is, the bottom line. Sponsor support is the life blood of your event. Get your costs covered by sponsorship, and don’t roll the dice on ticket sales. In fact, many youth events have free admission—or tickets at family-friendly prices.

The NFL blackout rule is as dated as event organizers depending on ticket sales to pay for your event. Ticket sales are not a measure of support for the sport. The event world knows that—the NFL needs to realize that as well.

Jackie

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications

700 West Pete Rose Way

Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office

(513) 708-5822, mobile

(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com

www.gamedaypr.com

LinkedIn: JackieReau

Facebook: JackieReau

Twitter:@JackieReau

Transporting Your Display Materials to a Small Show or Conference

January 8, 2014

Shipping your display materials to conferences, special events, or small trade shows can be a cost-effective and easy option to get your materials where they need to be. Through FedEx, you can ship your package to a nearby FedEx Office store at no extra cost. There are many FedEx locations around the country – often times right around the corner from, if not in, your hotel or conference center. This way you won’t have to stuff your marketing collateral in your personal suitcase, haul around another set of luggage, or pay for an additional bag. The best part is if you are an enrolled member in the NASC Shipping Program, your FedEx discounts apply to the shipment.

Watch this helpful video or follow these simple steps to benefit from this free service:

  1. Find a FedEx Office location
  2. Create your shipment
  3. Select the option “hold at a FedEx location”
  4. Pickup at your convenience

This tip is brought to you by PartnerShip®, the company that manages the NASC Shipping Program. For more information or to enroll, email sales@PartnerShip.com or call 800-599-2902.

Register Now for Upcoming Webinars

January 7, 2014

Recently, many of our Rights Holder members have presented Event Webinars to more thoroughly share information about their events and requirements to bid with destinations interested in hosting events. The opportunity to host an event webinar is a benefit of membership and a unique way to reach numerous cities simultaneously.

Upcoming Webinar schedule:

  • Event Webinar – Tuesday, January 14th at 12pm ET – United States Olympic Committee – REGISTER NOW
  • Best Practices Webinar – Tuesday, January 28th at 2pm ET – Playing the Game of Social Media Marketing by Doug Motel, Author and Social Media Expert – REGISTER NOW

If you are interested in hosting an event webinar to discuss your RFP and bid requirements or have any questions, please contact Elizabeth Chaney Young, Director of Membership & Marketing, at Elizabeth@SportsCommissions.org.

Visit the webinar archives (login required) page in case you missed any of our recent webinars. Check out the infographic below to view the Q&A session from our recent event webinar with National Senior Games:

NSGA Q and A