Archive for the ‘Economic Impact’ Category

Tips for the RFP Process

February 9, 2016

Responding to an RFP can be a daunting task, especially in the sports market.  Yet, tackling an RFP piece-by-piece can make the process easier and, hopefully, yield lucrative results.

The first thing you need to do is make sure that the requirements are a good fit for your destination. Read the RFP thoroughly to see if you have the items needed to place a bid.  The bare bones necessary are the venues, hotel space, volunteer availability, expertise of a Local Organizing Committee (LOC) and a plan to deal with bid fees.  If you have any questions, pick up the phone and call the planner.  A phone call will go a long way, and allows you to find out what the hot button issues are. In some cases, what you might think is important actually may be unimportant for the planner.  Always ask the question. For example, if a bid specifies that your fields need to have lights but yours don’t, ask the planner if lack of lights is a deal breaker.  Another example might be that a client prefers Hilton properties, but the bulk of your rooms are with Marriott. If this happens, let the client know, and check to see if this will be an issue for the bid.

One of the most important steps in this process is to check the history of the event you are bidding on.  The best way to do this is to talk to the CVBs or Sports Commissions in cities that have hosted the event in the past.  Ask them about venues used, hotel pickup and if there were any challenges with the event operator.  Make sure to find out if they had any overall problems with the event.  This information is very valuable, and will help you in the RFP process.  It is important to also check the geographical history of the event – has the event ever occurred in your region? Some events are a better fit to certain areas of the country- what works in the South might not work as well in the North. It’s fine to let a client know that you have researched their event.  It shows that you are thorough and helps keep them transparent and communicative.

Many destinations cannot afford – or simply won’t pay – bid fees. Many times, a bid fee can be circumvented by offering concessions instead.  A list of concessions is usually provided along with the bid fee. These can include complimentary hotel rooms, airline tickets, rental cars etc.   Only the sales person and the destination marketing or sports organization can determine if you can address their concessions.  Perhaps you can form a partnership with a local rental car agency to get a reduced weekly rate in exchange for agency being listed as the sponsor. Airlines can be a bit challenging, however contact your local hub, they may be willing to work with you. Utilize relationships with the hotels in the area to obtain comp rooms for the proposal.  Some events will require two or more hotels to fill the comps. Always make sure the comp policy is consistent across hotels listed in the proposal.

Once you have collected all of the information required for the bid, prepare to submit the proposal. If you have not been able to meet all the concessions, it is still okay to submit. Several things can happen at this point. One response may be, that, although the concessions were not completely met, the facilities may be a better fit for the event. Another response could be a flat out no, however the organizer now is aware what you are able to do and may come back for future events.

It is important to ask for decision dates as a part of the proposal submission. If it is not specifically addressed in the RFP, make sure to ask. This allows organizations to hold space at facilities until decision time. Some facilities will place the space on “hold” for a certain number of days and give the event planner the “right of refusal” for the dates. In that case the organization on “hold” will have to go to contract and send a deposit for the space. Some organizations will request a site visit as a part of the decision process. With years of experience, it is safe to say a site visit should typically last two days to include venue and hotel options.

John Gibbons, CSEE
Executive Director of the RI Sports Commission
JGibbons@GoSportsRI.ocm

Ron Eifert, CSEE
Senior Sales Manager
Dayton Convention & Visitors Bureau
reifert@daytoncvb.net

Off-season planning for the 2016 NASC Sports Event Symposium

December 15, 2015

It’s the season of lists. Holiday shopping, wish lists, parties, and making sure you end up on the “nice” list. In the spirit of lists, here’s your NASC 2016 Sports Event Symposium “TO DO” list. Right now is the best time to do your off-season prep, get organized, take care of the logistics, and position yourself to rock it in the new year. Grand Rapids, here we come.

(1) Get registered! You have to be there April 3-7, 2016 to take advantage of this direct selling, education, networking opportunity. It only takes a few clicks. Don’t forget the add-ons and let NASC know if this is your first Symposium. See? Easy.

(2) Make your hotel reservation. You have two choices in Grand Rapids, The Amway Grand Plaza Hotel or the JW Marriott Grand Rapids. You can’t go wrong with either property. Both have plenty of amenities and are convenient to the action at DeVos Place Convention Center. (Room blocks will sell out, so don’t delay on this one. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.)

(3) Book your flight/make travels plans. Local airport is GRR with plenty of lift — 6 airlines and 22 major market direct flights. Or, if you feel the need to road trip, Grand Rapids is easy to get to. Our NASC staff made the trek via car last summer from Cincinnati in under six hours with no speeding tickets (I think).

(4) Update your member profile. This is a good idea any time of the year, but especially when your potential partners are looking for you in prep for the Symposium. Logon to the NASC website and search for yourself in the member directory.  Make sure your POC is current and your message is relevant to your goals for your meetings this spring. It’s the NASC version of Googling yourself.

(5) Ok, now for additional cool stuff. The NASC Member Awards program is great way to recognize those in our industry that deserve our praise. Learn more here.

There are also opportunities to do good work and leave a mark on the local community while in Grand Rapids. Watch for details on the Sports Legacy Fund Community Service Project and get involved by joining your fellow colleagues at a local park clean up. We’d love to see everyone ready with sleeves rolled up. Don’t fret about the weather, no one froze last year! The Sports Legacy Fund silent auction and raffle will benefit the Mary Free Bed Wheelchair and Adaptive Sports Wheelchair Tennis Program. This organization assists hundreds of children and adults participate in a variety of organized team sports. Details on donating can be found here. Please, please bring your raffle ticket CA$H and your credit card with the highest limit.

(6) Get your clients to Grand Rapids. Are your current partners NASC members? Wouldn’t it be awesome to see them at the Symposium?  Why not personally invite them to join the association and meet you there. If you need membership info or would like a member of the Membership Committee to contact them, just say the word.

There you have it. Include this list with all the others. Check these items off now to be ready when the Symposium season arrives. See you in Grand Rapids. Ready…..Go!

Janna Clark, CSEE
Elizabethtown Sports Park
NASC Board of Directors
NASC Mentoring Committee

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now

November 18, 2015

Mark your calendars now! We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below, and reserve your spot today!



Tips for Building Community Relationships
Best Practices Webinar
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Building relationships within your community is essential to the success of sporting events you host. From venue support, event management, volunteer recruitment, fundraising and sponsorships, your local community holds the resources that rights holders look for when awarding events. Join Bonny Bernat of Visit Winston-Salem as she shares best practices used in hosting events in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. If you are unable to join us on the 24th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



USA Triathlon

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Thursday, December 17, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Join Brian D’Amico, National Events Senior Manager, USA Triathlon, as he discusses USA Triathlon and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 17th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Contact the Member Services Department if you have any questions.

More from your venue

October 26, 2015

It sounds like the old Larry Bird-Magic Johnson McDonald’s commercial..off the backstop, through the dugout, off the steps..but at Petco Park, it’ll be the way you play miniature golf—and it’s a unique sponsorship activation at the same time.

Over the first weekend in November, the San Diego Padres and Callaway Golf will create a nine-hole layout around the downtown ball park. The Links at Petco Park, to be held November 5-8, will begin on a putting green in the home dugout. Golfers will move to the ballpark’s upper deck for Nos. 2-5, where they will hit shots onto the field from various locations. The sixth will tee off on the field near the Western Metal Supply Co. building in the left field corner before golfers move to the batter’s eye in center field for No. 7. The eighth hole will be a putting green in the bullpen. The final hole will be on the roof of the Western Metal Supply Co. Building.

Prices are $100 for twosomes and $200 for foursomes. Callaway will provide clubs and balls. Upgraded packages include specially branded Callaway clubs and tickets to a future Padres game. No surprise, tee times are all gone, but you can still sign up for a wait list.

“We’re always trying to provide authentic golf experiences with our products that are unique and engaging, and that’s exactly what this partnership with the Padres is about,” Callaway senior vice president of marketing Harry Arnett told the Padres’ website. “Playing a nine-hole course at a venue like Petco Park with Callaway golf clubs and balls will be a once-in-a-lifetime round, and we are excited to be a part of it.”

Each hole along the course will feature a unique theme and an opportunity to win prizes like a new Callaway Great Big Bertha Driver, with various holes offering corresponding snacks and beverages.

We’ve talked about using existing venues for new events. The Petco Park activation, the Fenway Park snow jumping event this winter, even stadium concerts, all offer new revenue streams for venues at a time when their stadium wouldn’t be used. And, it gives fans a unique look at a facility they thought they were familiar with. More and more facilities are taking a new look at how to bring in fans, and money, during what would otherwise be the off-season.

Petco Park links course

illustration is courtesy San Diego Padres

Finding funding: Sometimes it comes to you

July 28, 2015

So you have a great idea for a new event for your facility: It would bring in hundreds of athletes who would stay multiple days and bring in thousands of dollars to the local economy.

Or, you’d like to expand your facility, adding fields or courts, which would allow you to bring in bigger, better events. All sounds good, but the bottom line, as they say, is the bottom line: How to pay for all of this?

It’s a universal issue that all organizations, rights holders, facility operators, high school and college athletic departments or team managers face. You may have great ideas, but you don’t have the resources to fund them. Where does the money come from?

As a sports corporation or CVB, you might ask your sales staff to acquire more sponsorships or partnerships. (what your sales staff says after you leave the room, well, that’s out of our control)

We already know that more colleges and universities, especially those outside the “Power Five” conferences, are looking to beer sales at games to help fund the athletic department. A year ago, there were 21 on-campus football stadiums where any fan of legal age could grab a brew. That’s more than twice as many as five years ago.

Troy University Athletic Director John Hartwell estimated that beer would account for $200,000 in commissions for the season. According to its contract with concessionaire Sodexo, Troy receives 43 percent of gross beer sales at its 30,000-seat stadium, or better than $2 for every $5 beer.

But sometimes the money comes to you, through an endowment. A trend that started in the Ivy League and spread to other schools is now becoming the new way to save that school from paying a salary.

The most recent example? Richard Corbett, a Florida real-estate executive who served as the business manager of Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign, gave $35 million to the University of Notre Dame, from which he graduated in 1960.

Of the total, $25 million will go for a new building to house the anthropology and psychology departments and a digital-media center. He also directed $10 million of the gift to endow the university’s head football coach position.

In another case, Xavier’s men’s basketball coach, Chris Mack, is now the Sedler Family Men’s Head Basketball Coach after Tom and Genny Sedler provided Xavier with the endowment to fund Coach Mack’s salary. The endowment basically allows the university to take the money that would go to salaries and use it somewhere else.

The academic side has been doing this for decades, as donors have funded the “so-and-so-chair for chemical engineering research” at universities around the country. So how can you get the endowment idea to work for you?

It might come in the form of a civic-minded philanthropist who wants to fund a new soccer or basketball complex, or a company that can use foundation dollars to help a community cause while getting its name out in public.

This is a time we all have to be creative to find sponsorship and partnership dollars. Doing a form of an endowment might be the way to get your project from the drawing board, into the community.

ball field

NCAA Baseball Remains Big Business

May 28, 2015

Omaha, Nebraska isn’t the only place that profits from the NCAA baseball tournament.

Omaha, of course, the long-time host of the College World Series, sees the tournament as a major economic driver as well as a showcase for the area. In 2012 it’s estimated the tournament generated more than $20 million worth of media coverage for the city. And a report by Goss & Associates Economic Solutions estimates that between 2008 and 2018 the CWS will add $514.8 million to the Omaha economy, or $385.6 million in 2008 dollars.

But other cities that are the hosts for the baseball regionals are seeing a positive economic impact as well. Tulsa’s first Big 12 championship baseball tournament’s five days of competition are expected to be exciting for more than just college sports fans.

According to the Tulsa Regional Chamber, the Big 12 Baseball Championship is expected to have a total economic impact of close to $5.6 million in revenue.

The Tulsa Sports Commission’s budget to put on the event was just less than $800,000, said Ray Hoyt, president of VisitTulsa and the Tulsa Sports Commission.

The Tulsa World reports that the $5.6 million in revenue includes $3.2 million, the amount spent by outside visitors; $221, the average each visitor who spends the night in Tulsa is expected to spend per day during the tournament; and $142, the average each visitor who doesn’t spend the night will spend per day.

A particular goal for this week is to run the event in a way and produce turnout that will strengthen the city’s relationship with the Big 12 as well as the NCAA. Tulsa has an application in to be the host for the 2018 Big 12 Baseball Championship as well as conference events as soon as next year.

Amenities added include a free “Fan Fest” area where about 6,000 were expected during the weekend, pop-up bars and other activities between games. To help fund the extras, a number of area businesses stepped up with donations and sponsorships.

As Ray Hoyt, president of VisitTulsa and the Tulsa Sports Commission told the Tulsa World, “Sports is a business. They (the businesses) understand the return on investment to Tulsa.”

Whether it’s the NCAA world series, a regional site or a conference tournament, CVBs and sports commissions are seeing the value in being the host for thousands of passionate fans, ready to party and ready to spend.

More than 200 sports tourism professionals in attendance at NASC Market Segment Meetings and CSEE Fall Module Held in Conjunction with USOC Olympic Sportslink

October 2, 2014

More than 200 NASC members gathered in Chicago, IL for the NASC semi-annual meeting from September 22-23, 2014. Hosted in conjunction with the USOC’s Olympic SportsLink conference, programming for the semi-annual meeting included: CSEE Fall 2014 Module, NASC Market Segment Meetings, and NASC Board of Directors meeting.

Daniel Diermeier, Ph. D., from the University of Chicago, presented the four-hour CSEE module on Crisis Management to 126 NASC members.  It focused on the key issues in a crisis situation and managing the flow of information.  After a 90 minute keynote presentation, attendees participated in a team activity that thrust them into a real-life crisis issue that grew beyond personal safety to include emotional issues and competing points of view. The session ended with a mock media conference and debriefing.  At the conclusion of the module, nine participants earned their CSEE credential.

Fall 2014 CSEE Graduates

Laura Garratt, CSEE, San Mateo County/Silicon Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau
John Giantonio, CSEE, Casper Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
Pete Harvey, CSEE,  Buffalo Niagara Sports Commission
Nick Hope, CSEE,  Al J. Schneider Company
Gen Howard, CSEE, Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau
Alison Huber, CSEE, Wisconsin Dells Visitor & Convention Bureau
Lisa Pacheco, CSEE, Sports Williamsburg
Matt Robinette, CSEE, Richmond Region Tourism
Marva Wells, CSEE, High Point Convention and Visitors Bureau

The most recent class of certified sports event executives joins an elite group of only 140 sports tourism industry professionals across the country who share the CSEE credential. The next module will be held Monday, April 27th in Milwaukee, WI in conjunction with the 23rd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium.

The NASC Market Segment Meetings, created in 2006 to offer destinations with similar market size and organizational structure a platform to share ideas, was led by professional facilitator Adrian Segar. Over two days, 178 NASC members participated in discussions on the hottest topics  including local organizing committees, hotels, sports services, marketing/sponsorships, the bid process and bid fees, industry trends, facilities & facility management, economic impact, and creating your own events.

Additionally, the NASC Sports Legacy Committee announced Running Rebels Community Organization as the 2015 beneficiary of the NASC Sports Legacy Fund and kicked off the annual fundraiser with a 50/50 Split the Pot Raffle, raising nearly $500. The Sports Legacy committee’s goal is to raise $20,000 through a variety of activities to take place over the next six months with an emphasis placed on the silent auction and raffle to be held at the upcoming NASC Symposium.  Learn more about Running Rebels or how you can help leave a legacy.

At the conclusion of the Market Segment Meetings, the NASC board of directors held their monthly meeting. The agenda included reviewing the summer board action items, hearing updates from the retained earnings and hall of fame ad-hoc committees, sharing ideas and input on the marketing of the association to event rights holders and reviewing the 2014 mid-year membership survey results.  The NASC Board of Directors meets on a monthly basis via conference call and three times a year face-to-face.  If you are interested in applying for the 2015-2016 NASC Board of Directors to help lead the industry’s only not-for-profit association visit http://www.sportscommissions.org/About/Board-of-Directors/Nominations.

Current plans are to hold the 2015 NASC Market Segment Meetings in conjunction with the 2015 USOC SportsLink Conference. Dates and times for next year’s meetings will be announced in winter of 2015.

Prospecting in the NASC Sports Marketplace

August 18, 2014

Let’s talk for a few minutes about Sports Marketplaces. The NASC developed the first Sports Marketplace in the late nineties and since then it’s become an intricate part of the annual NASC Sports Event Symposium. And looking at the recent responses from our meeting in Oklahoma City, we can tell that your interest in the sports marketplace is as high as or higher than ever, and it turns out to be the number one reason why many of you attend the symposium and we understand that. One of the questions I would ask you though is to determine for yourself whether you’re prepared for the sports marketplace before you begin. And now we’re talking from the cities point of view, because one of the concerns, I personally have is, that many of you are relatively inexperienced in the industry are expecting to go to the Sports Event Marketplace and pick up business in 10 to 12 minutes, when you’re not even sure whether your destination can host the events you’re talking about. How do you fix that?

First, don’t go to a Sports Marketplace until you know the kinds of events you can host, and which age groups, and why. And if you don’t know that, you’re going to have to find somebody to help you determine what you can do before you talk to anybody. Because what happens is, a very simple prophecy is fulfilled if you don’t know whether you can handle the event or not, and you show the event owner in a sports marketplace appointment that that’s the case, what you’re doing is losing the business, rather than gaining the business.

What’s a proper approach to a sports marketplace appointment? Be prepared, be absolutely ready with what you can do and don’t take appointments with people who have events that you can’t handle. How do you find out where these events are? You go to the Rights Holder section of our database and you can find hundreds of event owners, and you can determine by sport which ones you ought to be talking to. And it makes common sense, to go ahead and do your homework before you go to the marketplace, at all.

Now, there has been some thought about restricting appointments at the marketplace to people who have been members and have attended the symposium for at least two years, and not have marketplace appointments with new people. That, of course, is not what we are going to do. Instead, I think you’re going to find the NASC to rely itself increasingly on Rapid RFP Review sessions; where an event rights holder meets with 10 or 12, or 15 of you at one time, “Here’s what we’ve got, this is what we’re looking for, go off do your homework. When you know you have it, get in touch with us, let’s talk then.” That’s a great way to do this. What is not a great way is to say to yourself before you arrive on-site for a sports marketplace series of appointments, is all I have to do to be successful in this business is to have a bunch of appointments, talk to a bunch of people, I’ll make friends and they’ll want to do business with me.” That’s not the way this business works, never has, never will, and it will be a waste of your time and a waste of the other event owners time, also.

I wish you well in all of your marketplace appointments, but I also, would wish preparation and the understanding that in 10 to 12 minutes you can lose a relationship faster than you can gain one. It is a terrific way to go back and say hi to old friends and acquaintances, and remind them that you are still interested in doing business with them. It is a terrible way to show people that you’re too new to know what’s going on.

Video blog: Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director
National Association of Sports Commissions
513.281.3888     –     http://www.sportscommissions.org 
Published  August 18, 2014

Economic Impact Calculator

March 24, 2014

Properly assessing the economic impact of sporting events you host within your community is a key aspect to helping your organization strategically determine several things.  Whether to pursue an event, whether to bring an event back, and whether the event provides your local tourism industry a meaningful boost.

The NASC Calculator aims to provide users a tool for gathering a rough first-approximation of the potential economic impact that an event has upon your community.  As such, the primary purpose of the session is to further educate users how to navigate the Calculator in practice.

Additionally, a secondary goal of this session is to educate users how to design and implement on-site spectator surveys.  The recommended approach for using the Calculator is to gather event-specific data regarding how visitors spend money at hotels, restaurants, and more…as well as gather information on where they are from.  Thus, the presentation will yield insight into best practices for implementing on-site surveys.

Is the Super Bowl a Super Win for the Hosts?

January 30, 2014

The Super Bowl has long been seen as the big ‘get’ for any host city. With international exposure, out of town visitors and spending all week, it looks to be a no-brainer event.

For the upcoming Super Bowl XLVIII, it’s estimated the game and ancillary events will mean a half billion dollars to the greater New York metropolitan area, according to the Sport Management Research Institute. The New York/New Jersey Super Bowl Host Committee says the economic impact is estimated to be between $500 million and $600 million for the region, including hotels, restaurants, bars, taxis, car services and small businesses.

Now, most sources think those estimates are pie in the sky, at best. A more historical look at the spending comes from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Over the last 12 years the actual direct spending for Super Bowls has been between $113 million and $202 million for each game.

“The true economic impact comes from visitors only, with no spending by locals included except staging costs for the game and ancillary events. These expenses are incurred solely to meet the needs of the event, so it is spending above what would otherwise take place. The displacement theory (crowding out) is a bigger factor in a warm weather site, where visits for non-game purposes could come close to or even match those for the game,” said Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director of NASC.

For Indianapolis and its Super Bowl XLVI, a report by Rockport Analytics shows that more than 116,000 non-residents came to Indiana’s capital for the game and other events. Indianapolis non-residents brought in more than 472,000 visitor days in the metro area (how many visitors would otherwise come to Indy in the middle of winter?). Hotel occupancy averaged 93% for the area, 99% for downtown.

Visitors to Indy spent more than $264 million on the local economy, averaging nearly $571 per person, per day. All totaled, gross spending total economic impacts of Super Bowl XLVI was an estimated $324 million, broken down to $176 million in direct impact, $67 million in indirect impact and $81 million in income. With Indianapolis keeping $324 million of the $384 million in Super Bowl-initiated spending, about 84 cents of every dollar spent, stayed in Indianapolis. No wonder Indy is bidding again for the 2018 game.

Another factor to include is that economic impact studies on an event as big as a Super Bowl focuses on economic activity created by the game, and not economic activity prevented by the game. Victor Matheson, a sports economist at the College of Holy Cross puts it this way: “They don’t do a very good job measuring how many people are crowded away from the metropolitan area during that weekend because, you know, no one in their right mind goes to the Super Bowl city during Super Bowl weekend unless they’re there for the game,” he said. “Which means any regular business that normally would have happened gets crowded out.”

This Super Bowl also is unique is that it crosses state lines. It’s expected that New York City will get the big spenders who’ll stay in Manhattan, the New Jersey hotels and the service industry will benefit, including local restaurants and limo services.

Will it be a half billion dollar infusion into the area economy? Whatever the dollar figure, it’s invaluable in the halo effect (and media attention) the area has, now that it can call itself a “Super Bowl host.”

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications

700 West Pete Rose Way

Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office

(513) 708-5822, mobile

(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com

http://www.gamedaypr.com

LinkedIn: JackieReau

Facebook: JackieReau

Twitter:@JackieReau

Cast Your Net Out for New Sports Revenue

January 27, 2014

Looking for a new event to bring participants, fans and families to your region?

Look no further than your nearest body of water.

A report released by the American Sportfishing Association (ASA), the trade association representing the sportfishing industry, shows that the number of anglers has increased 11 percent over the last six years, and fishing tackle sales grew more than 16 percent. Times that by the 60 million fishermen and women in the United States, and that’s a group carrying some powerful economic impact.

And this doesn’t include the many fishing tournaments held around the country. This is the family, packing up the rods and reels, or a group of buddies hitching up the boat and driving to the nearest lake.

Here’s how ASA President and CEO Mike Nussman sees it: “As an industry, we are keenly aware of the impact that sportfishing has on this nation’s economy, Just by enjoying a day on the water, men, women and children across the United States pump billions of dollars into this country’s economy.”

A closer look at the numbers from this report shows just how strong this impact is.

America’s nearly 60 million anglers are estimated to spend $46 billion per year on fishing equipment, transportation, lodging and other expenses associated with their sport. With a total annual economic impact of $115 billion, fishing supports more than 828,000 jobs and generates $35 billion in wages and $15 billion in federal and state taxes.

Even during the recession years, fishing, seen to be a relatively affordable sport, still saw spending on tackle, travel and the like, grow around five percent.

In Canada, a 2010 study of Nova Scotia’s fishing business showed that fishing generated $58 million in direct spending that year, with an economic impact of $85.6 million each year. What may be more impressive, Nova Scotia had more than 57,000 licensed anglers that year-14,466 of them were youth, showing that fishing is growing its own sustainable base for the future.

And fishing is seen as a true family pastime. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, fishing as a leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing basketball or softball, skateboarding, jogging or hiking.

Take the economic impact of fishing and outdoor sports one step further: A Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World store being built in Round Rock, Texas for a 2015 opening, is expected to bring in nearly $400 million in taxable sales during its first decade of operation—both within the store and at surrounding businesses. The net benefit for Round Rock, according to the city, could total more than $5 million during the same period.

At the same time, Bass Pro Shops is planning a store in North Charleston, with the expectation that the store will bring in at least 35 percent of its visitors from at least 50 miles from the South Carolina location.

In Lone Tree, Colorado, another fishing and outdoor store, Cabela’s, is expected to mean about a $24 million economic impact to Douglas County.

So whether it’s on ice, from a boat or on the shore, fishing can mean a big economic catch for your region.