Archive for the ‘industry conferences’ Category

2016 NASC Sports Marketplace Appointment Process

January 12, 2016

As reported in the September edition of the NASC Playbook, the Symposium Committee, based on member feedback, has created a new framework for the 2016 NASC Sports Marketplace. In this edition of the “Tips from the Mentoring Committee”, we offer the following thoughts on improvements to the appointment process and how all members can benefit from hitting the reset button on what to expect from the NASC Sports Marketplace in Grand Rapids.

Individual Appointments

Think “New Relationship NASC Sports Marketplace”

From its inception in San Antonio, TX in 1997, the purpose of the NASC Sports Marketplace has been to provide opportunities for NEW BUSINESS development for our members.

Individual appointments, which are 10 minutes each, offer destinations and vendor exhibitors the opportunity to share information about their community and/or products/services with event owners.  Ideally, individual appointments should be requested by organizations that are not currently doing business with one another.  Anyone who has attended the NASC Symposium knows the schedule includes ample time for current business partners to conduct meetings and network with each other.

For the first time, participating members will have an extended window to request, accept/decline, and prioritize individual appointments. The online appointment portal will open the first week of January and remain open until February 26, 2016.

Why the extended time?  Eight weeks gives everyone time to properly evaluate and research the organizations with whom they are requesting an appointment and organizations requesting an appointment of them.  The goal is to eliminate individual appointments taking place between a destination and/or vendor and event owner where there is clearly no opportunity to do business. For example, if a destination doesn’t have facilities required to host a particular sport and/or event, then the destination should not be requesting an appointment with that event owner.  With time to evaluate and research, these potentially embarrassing situations can and should be avoided.

Event Overview Appointments

Think “Learning & Listening Marketplace”

Event Overview Appointments offer event owners the opportunity to share information about their organization and what it takes to host an event with destinations whom they have not done business.  This is not a time to sell your destination or product/service to the event owner, but rather listen to the event overview and gather information about event requirements, future opportunities, etc. If your organization qualifies to host an event or provide a product/service based on what you learn during the appointment, then follow up after the Symposium.

How does this work?  Destinations, vendor exhibitors, and event owners will have the opportunity to request, accept/decline, and prioritize event overview appointments. These appointments will take place at tables in the Sports Marketplace, not at the event owner’s booth.  Up to five (5) destinations and/or vendor exhibitors will be seated at a table with one event owner. The event owner will provide information on what it takes to host their event and may allow a minute or two at the end of the 10-minute appointment for questions.

Key Dates

  • Week of January 4 – Individual Appointment schedule portal opens
  • Midnight PT February 19 – Last day to registered to be guaranteed appointments
  • Midnight PT February 26 – Individual Appointment portal closes
  • Week of March 14 – Individual Appointment schedules released and Event Overview Appointment portal opens
  • Midnight PT March 18 – Event Overview Appointment portal closes
  • Week of March 28 – Event Overview Appointment schedules released

It is important to note, registration fees must be paid in full before the first attendee from your organization can view the online appointment portal.

Direct any questions about the appointment process to your member services coordinator.

Active Members:

Meagan McCalla, Meagan@SportsCommissions.org or 513.842.8307.

Allied and Rights Holder Members:

Allison Deak, Allison@SportsCommissions.org or 513.250.4366.

Yours in sport,

John David, CSEE
USA BMX
NASC Mentoring Committee Co-Chair
John@USABMX.com

Mike Price, CSEE
Greater Lansing Sports Authority
NASC Mentoring Committee Co-Chair
mprice@lansing.org

 

Managing Expectations

December 29, 2015

One of the most important aspects of any tradeshow is managing expectations. There’s a reason that destinations and sports event planners see a tradeshow as a helpful marketing tool. Instead of trying to maintain relationships at arm’s length, you have a chance to actually meet the people you do business with and connect with your peers.

Attending your first sports tradeshow, however, can be a bit overwhelming and certainly confusing at times.  Conducting a little research before heading to the NASC Sports Event Symposium will go a long way.

When the online appointment portal opens, the first registered attendee from your organization will be able to view the list of registered organizations with whom you have an opportunity to meet. Doing a little research to find out if your destination or your sports event is a good match will save you a lot of time.  At the tradeshow, the 10-minute appointment will be over before you know it. Having as much information about who you are meeting with will provide you more time to establish key relationships. The more you know before you go will provide you with more confidence during your scheduled appointments.

Now let’s talk giveaways. From my experience, during your appointments, less is more when it comes to swag – especially when most of what you are giving away will end up as trash. Trying to juggle giveaways, take notes, and exchange business cards is a lot to manage. Business cards are typically all you need.  Following up after the show is the best way to continue the dialogue. If you say you will follow up with specific items, make sure you do.

You may come back with a couple of leads and you may come back with only business cards. The most important takeaway from attending the Symposium is the relationships you are beginning to cultivate.

Remember that the goal of any tradeshow marketing experience goes way beyond just making sales and closing deals. Building your brand, promoting your destination, sport, or services, networking with peers and potential new clients, and sizing up competitors in your industry are all part of the tradeshow experience. All of these takeaways should be accurately reflected as tangible goals in your tradeshow marketing efforts.

Cheryl McCullough
NASC Mentoring Committee

 

 

Off-season planning for the 2016 NASC Sports Event Symposium

December 15, 2015

It’s the season of lists. Holiday shopping, wish lists, parties, and making sure you end up on the “nice” list. In the spirit of lists, here’s your NASC 2016 Sports Event Symposium “TO DO” list. Right now is the best time to do your off-season prep, get organized, take care of the logistics, and position yourself to rock it in the new year. Grand Rapids, here we come.

(1) Get registered! You have to be there April 3-7, 2016 to take advantage of this direct selling, education, networking opportunity. It only takes a few clicks. Don’t forget the add-ons and let NASC know if this is your first Symposium. See? Easy.

(2) Make your hotel reservation. You have two choices in Grand Rapids, The Amway Grand Plaza Hotel or the JW Marriott Grand Rapids. You can’t go wrong with either property. Both have plenty of amenities and are convenient to the action at DeVos Place Convention Center. (Room blocks will sell out, so don’t delay on this one. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.)

(3) Book your flight/make travels plans. Local airport is GRR with plenty of lift — 6 airlines and 22 major market direct flights. Or, if you feel the need to road trip, Grand Rapids is easy to get to. Our NASC staff made the trek via car last summer from Cincinnati in under six hours with no speeding tickets (I think).

(4) Update your member profile. This is a good idea any time of the year, but especially when your potential partners are looking for you in prep for the Symposium. Logon to the NASC website and search for yourself in the member directory.  Make sure your POC is current and your message is relevant to your goals for your meetings this spring. It’s the NASC version of Googling yourself.

(5) Ok, now for additional cool stuff. The NASC Member Awards program is great way to recognize those in our industry that deserve our praise. Learn more here.

There are also opportunities to do good work and leave a mark on the local community while in Grand Rapids. Watch for details on the Sports Legacy Fund Community Service Project and get involved by joining your fellow colleagues at a local park clean up. We’d love to see everyone ready with sleeves rolled up. Don’t fret about the weather, no one froze last year! The Sports Legacy Fund silent auction and raffle will benefit the Mary Free Bed Wheelchair and Adaptive Sports Wheelchair Tennis Program. This organization assists hundreds of children and adults participate in a variety of organized team sports. Details on donating can be found here. Please, please bring your raffle ticket CA$H and your credit card with the highest limit.

(6) Get your clients to Grand Rapids. Are your current partners NASC members? Wouldn’t it be awesome to see them at the Symposium?  Why not personally invite them to join the association and meet you there. If you need membership info or would like a member of the Membership Committee to contact them, just say the word.

There you have it. Include this list with all the others. Check these items off now to be ready when the Symposium season arrives. See you in Grand Rapids. Ready…..Go!

Janna Clark, CSEE
Elizabethtown Sports Park
NASC Board of Directors
NASC Mentoring Committee

More than 200 sports tourism professionals in attendance at NASC Market Segment Meetings and CSEE Fall Module Held in Conjunction with USOC Olympic Sportslink

October 2, 2014

More than 200 NASC members gathered in Chicago, IL for the NASC semi-annual meeting from September 22-23, 2014. Hosted in conjunction with the USOC’s Olympic SportsLink conference, programming for the semi-annual meeting included: CSEE Fall 2014 Module, NASC Market Segment Meetings, and NASC Board of Directors meeting.

Daniel Diermeier, Ph. D., from the University of Chicago, presented the four-hour CSEE module on Crisis Management to 126 NASC members.  It focused on the key issues in a crisis situation and managing the flow of information.  After a 90 minute keynote presentation, attendees participated in a team activity that thrust them into a real-life crisis issue that grew beyond personal safety to include emotional issues and competing points of view. The session ended with a mock media conference and debriefing.  At the conclusion of the module, nine participants earned their CSEE credential.

Fall 2014 CSEE Graduates

Laura Garratt, CSEE, San Mateo County/Silicon Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau
John Giantonio, CSEE, Casper Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
Pete Harvey, CSEE,  Buffalo Niagara Sports Commission
Nick Hope, CSEE,  Al J. Schneider Company
Gen Howard, CSEE, Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau
Alison Huber, CSEE, Wisconsin Dells Visitor & Convention Bureau
Lisa Pacheco, CSEE, Sports Williamsburg
Matt Robinette, CSEE, Richmond Region Tourism
Marva Wells, CSEE, High Point Convention and Visitors Bureau

The most recent class of certified sports event executives joins an elite group of only 140 sports tourism industry professionals across the country who share the CSEE credential. The next module will be held Monday, April 27th in Milwaukee, WI in conjunction with the 23rd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium.

The NASC Market Segment Meetings, created in 2006 to offer destinations with similar market size and organizational structure a platform to share ideas, was led by professional facilitator Adrian Segar. Over two days, 178 NASC members participated in discussions on the hottest topics  including local organizing committees, hotels, sports services, marketing/sponsorships, the bid process and bid fees, industry trends, facilities & facility management, economic impact, and creating your own events.

Additionally, the NASC Sports Legacy Committee announced Running Rebels Community Organization as the 2015 beneficiary of the NASC Sports Legacy Fund and kicked off the annual fundraiser with a 50/50 Split the Pot Raffle, raising nearly $500. The Sports Legacy committee’s goal is to raise $20,000 through a variety of activities to take place over the next six months with an emphasis placed on the silent auction and raffle to be held at the upcoming NASC Symposium.  Learn more about Running Rebels or how you can help leave a legacy.

At the conclusion of the Market Segment Meetings, the NASC board of directors held their monthly meeting. The agenda included reviewing the summer board action items, hearing updates from the retained earnings and hall of fame ad-hoc committees, sharing ideas and input on the marketing of the association to event rights holders and reviewing the 2014 mid-year membership survey results.  The NASC Board of Directors meets on a monthly basis via conference call and three times a year face-to-face.  If you are interested in applying for the 2015-2016 NASC Board of Directors to help lead the industry’s only not-for-profit association visit http://www.sportscommissions.org/About/Board-of-Directors/Nominations.

Current plans are to hold the 2015 NASC Market Segment Meetings in conjunction with the 2015 USOC SportsLink Conference. Dates and times for next year’s meetings will be announced in winter of 2015.

National Association of Sports Commissions Raises $14,000 for Oklahoma Cleats for Kid

April 15, 2014

NASC Wraps Up Oklahoma City Meeting with Record Attendance

The National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC), the governing body of the $8.7 billion sports events industry, celebrated record attendance for its annual symposium held here last week.

814 attendees, including 206 first-timers, participated in last week’s NASC Symposium to elect new NASC leadership, honor members with industry awards and participate in dozens of continuing education programs led by industry leadership.

Also, during the event the NASC Sports Legacy Fund raised $14,000 to benefit Oklahoma Cleats for Kids, an Oklahoma City-based organization that collects, recycles and distributes new and gently used athletic shoes and equipment to kids in need.

Cleats for Kids at NASC

National Association of Sports Commissions Board Chair Kevin Smith presents a $14,000 grant to Cleats for Kids’ Stacy McDaniels and youth beneficiaries of the program at the 2014 NASC Symposium held in Oklahoma City last week.

NASC Playbook – December 2013 Edition Available Now

December 30, 2013
The latest edition of the NASC Playbook is available now.Image
Inside this issue:
  • 2013 Year in Review
  • CSEE/Market Segment Meeting Recap
  • 2014 Board Nominations
  • 2014 Member Awards
  • 22nd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium Preview
The NASC Playbook was created to feature members’ success stories and share industry best practices among the membership.  If your organization has a story to share and would like to be interviewed for a future article, contact Elizabeth Young, Director of Membership and Marketing.
Read the Playbook now.

NASC Sports Legacy Fund

January 31, 2013

The 2013 NASC Sports Symposium is around the corner and I hope everybody is getting ready for this event and all the events of your own upcoming this spring. I would like to have everyone just take a quick minute and try to get involved in a worthy cause and take the opportunity to showcase your area and events! After 2012 Hartford, I was looking to get more involved in NASC and contacted the national office and showed my interest in the Sport Legacy Committee and am very excited in our committee’s goals for this year’s symposium.

“Run. Louisville, Run” is the 2013 Beneficiary for the Sports Legacy fund. This program challenges youth ages 12-18, to train and complete the Triple crown of racing , a 10- mile race held in the Spring. This is a great opportunity for every member to get involved in this cause but more important to “show-off” something special or unique about your city, event or region.

Our committee is looking for you to donate an item or items from your city or event that best represents your area and can show all the other members what you’re doing for today’s sporting events around the country. If unable to donate, please pass the world around to all your colleagues about bidding on items at this year’s symposium or purchasing raffle tickets to win other great prizes.

I really think NASC and all its doing for our membership and the entire sports world is moving in the right direction and I hope you will consider donating to NASC Sports Legacy Fund. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to reach out to the membership and I look forward to seeing you in Louisville.

JIM STEELE, South Sioux City NE CVB

NASC Call for Proposals

October 23, 2012

Are you interested at presenting a breakouts session, or know someone who might be, at the upcoming 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium, April 22-25, 2013 in Louisville, KY.  If so check out the recently released Call for Proposals form.

The 2013 breakouts sessions are being collectively called “Engaging Education Sessions” with the aim of allowing attendees to drive their own learning experience by extracting the collective knowledge from industry experts and the audience.  There will be three sets of four concurrent sessions  (12 sessions in total) and each meeting room will have its own theme:

  1. Room 1: Event Management (for example: Local Organizing Committee (LOC); working with municipality, county, state governments; event insurance; contract negotiations; volunteer recruitment, training, recognition; preparing for an event; etc.)
  2. Room 2: Sales & Marketing (for example: sponsor development/fulfillment; membership recruitment; media partnerships; ticket sales; marketing plans; essentials of good salesmanship; effective promotional strategies, etc.)
  3. Room 3: Financial (for example: determining ROI; revenue sources for not-for-profits; economic impact; etc.)
  4. Room 4: Executive (for example: strategic planning; leadership and management skills; board relations; etc.)

Deadline to submit is Friday, November 9th.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 24, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

 

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

SportAccord 2012 Recap

June 5, 2012

The NASC was well represented at this year’s SportAccord Convention in Quebec City. SportAccord is owned by the international federations of summer and winter sports. It also attracts the meetings of the International Olympic Committee, and was the site for the announcement of the three finalist cities for the 2020 Olympic Games (Madrid, Istanbul, and Tokyo).

The United States Olympic Committee and the IOC also announced the resolution of their long simmering dispute over distribution of revenues from television and international sponsors. This dispute has made it difficult, if not impossible, for our cities to obtain a future Olympic Games (New York and Chicago both suffered under this dispute). The USOC is expected to begin assembling its strategy for a future bid later this month.

We have pressed for several years to schedule a meeting between international bid city representatives. Although it is common for cities in the USA and Canada to meet and discuss topics of interest, this is much less common everywhere else.

As far as we can determine, the City-to-City  session in Quebec City was the first time cities have met alone (with no consultants or suppliers and no international federations) to discuss topics of interest.

At the conclusion of the three hour session there was agreement to pursue additional meetings at future conferences, and to use input from the participants to plan for next year’s SportAccord in St. Petersburg, Russia.

SportAccord 2012 attracted 1800 people from across the globe. I have been honored to have assisted in seven of the ten conferences since its inception in 2003 in Madrid. The NASC places a high value on its relationship with SportAccord. We will continue to represent the USA at future conferences, and feel it is getting to the point where a USA Pavilion could be created. Our friends in Canada have had a Canadian cities pavilion for several years.

International championships can be costly ventures, and many countries have government programs in place to support bids. I was interested to learn that the Province of Quebec was increasing its annual budget in support of sports events from $4 to $8 million!

Must be nice.

– Don

Message from the Executive Director

May 29, 2012

Perhaps you have had the opportunity to read the recent Report on the Sports Travel Industry. If not, I hope you will be able to take a look. You can find it on our web site. The overall purpose was to sketch out the roles played by the organizations making up our industry.

In Hartford among the dozens and dozens of conversations I found some confusion among event owners on the roles played by convention and visitors bureaus. I also became aware of the need for some of our newer members to do their homework.

There can be a very big difference between the help offered to event owners by our members. In the more than thirty years I have spent dealing with these issues it surprises me to find event owners or publications who think one host organization is the same as most others. Not true. Some of you do a brilliant job selling your destination but must partner with a local organization to make events happen. You are not in the sports planning and delivery business.

Event owners need to pay particular attention to the abilities of prospective host organizations.

Sports commissions have professional staff that can handle every aspect of the event. Convention and visitors bureaus do an excellent job marketing the destination and assisting the event owner in connecting with local experts. A small number also have event experts on staff that can follow-up on behalf of the event owner.

As to the homework issue, it is just not enough to take appointments at the marketplace and think magic will occur. I was talking with a member who was excited about a new running track at one of their high schools. The message to me was they have this new track and are looking forward to hosting events. No concerns about the number and width of the lanes, where the field events take place, or other important details.

What can the NASC do to help?  We will review with our Symposium Committee ways in which we may be able to segment our breakout sessions. This can serve to focus attention on the various levels of expertise within the membership. I think this is particularly important as we prepare for Louisville. Our purpose will be to address in the coming months the things to keep in mind before contacting event owners.

We simply want to find the best ways to prepare each member for success.

I would be pleased to hear your thoughts.

– Don