Archive for the ‘sports industry trends’ Category

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now

November 18, 2015

Mark your calendars now! We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below, and reserve your spot today!



Tips for Building Community Relationships
Best Practices Webinar
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Building relationships within your community is essential to the success of sporting events you host. From venue support, event management, volunteer recruitment, fundraising and sponsorships, your local community holds the resources that rights holders look for when awarding events. Join Bonny Bernat of Visit Winston-Salem as she shares best practices used in hosting events in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. If you are unable to join us on the 24th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



USA Triathlon

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Thursday, December 17, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Join Brian D’Amico, National Events Senior Manager, USA Triathlon, as he discusses USA Triathlon and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 17th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Contact the Member Services Department if you have any questions.

NASC Signs Top Sponsors for Sports Event Symposium

November 12, 2014

Cincinnati (November 11, 2014) – The National Association of Sports Commissions welcomes its Elite and Diamond level sponsors for its upcoming Sports Event Symposium, to be held April 27-30 at the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee.

Elite level sponsors who have signed on for the Symposium include the host, VISIT Milwaukee, as well as the West Michigan Sports Commission.

Signed Diamond level sponsors include Foley Sports Tourism Complex (Alabama) and TEAM Maryland.

Foley Sports Tourism Complex will sponsor the Keynote Luncheon, TEAM Maryland the Sports Marketplace Aisle Signage, VISIT Milwaukee the Welcome Reception, and West Michigan Sports Commission, the Closing Celebration.

Grand Rapids and the West Michigan Sports Commission will be the host for the 2016 NASC Sports Event Symposium, Monday, April 4 through Thursday, April 7 at DeVos Place, downtown Grand Rapids.

“We are grateful for the support that our Elite and Diamond level sponsors continue to show the Sports Event Symposium each year,” said Don Schumacher, executive director. “Without their help, the Symposium would not continue to be the premiere education and networking event for sports professionals.”

The NASC Sports Event Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals.

Through a combination of industry-leading educational and business development opportunities, more than 800 Symposium attendees learn how to produce measurable ROI for their organization and advance their careers in the industry. To learn more about the Symposium and sponsorship opportunities, email beth@sportscommissions.org or visit www.sportscommissions.org/symposium.

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For more information or an interview with NASC staff, please contact Jackie Reau/Betsy Ross at Game Day Communications, 513-929-4263.

More than 200 sports tourism professionals in attendance at NASC Market Segment Meetings and CSEE Fall Module Held in Conjunction with USOC Olympic Sportslink

October 2, 2014

More than 200 NASC members gathered in Chicago, IL for the NASC semi-annual meeting from September 22-23, 2014. Hosted in conjunction with the USOC’s Olympic SportsLink conference, programming for the semi-annual meeting included: CSEE Fall 2014 Module, NASC Market Segment Meetings, and NASC Board of Directors meeting.

Daniel Diermeier, Ph. D., from the University of Chicago, presented the four-hour CSEE module on Crisis Management to 126 NASC members.  It focused on the key issues in a crisis situation and managing the flow of information.  After a 90 minute keynote presentation, attendees participated in a team activity that thrust them into a real-life crisis issue that grew beyond personal safety to include emotional issues and competing points of view. The session ended with a mock media conference and debriefing.  At the conclusion of the module, nine participants earned their CSEE credential.

Fall 2014 CSEE Graduates

Laura Garratt, CSEE, San Mateo County/Silicon Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau
John Giantonio, CSEE, Casper Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
Pete Harvey, CSEE,  Buffalo Niagara Sports Commission
Nick Hope, CSEE,  Al J. Schneider Company
Gen Howard, CSEE, Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau
Alison Huber, CSEE, Wisconsin Dells Visitor & Convention Bureau
Lisa Pacheco, CSEE, Sports Williamsburg
Matt Robinette, CSEE, Richmond Region Tourism
Marva Wells, CSEE, High Point Convention and Visitors Bureau

The most recent class of certified sports event executives joins an elite group of only 140 sports tourism industry professionals across the country who share the CSEE credential. The next module will be held Monday, April 27th in Milwaukee, WI in conjunction with the 23rd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium.

The NASC Market Segment Meetings, created in 2006 to offer destinations with similar market size and organizational structure a platform to share ideas, was led by professional facilitator Adrian Segar. Over two days, 178 NASC members participated in discussions on the hottest topics  including local organizing committees, hotels, sports services, marketing/sponsorships, the bid process and bid fees, industry trends, facilities & facility management, economic impact, and creating your own events.

Additionally, the NASC Sports Legacy Committee announced Running Rebels Community Organization as the 2015 beneficiary of the NASC Sports Legacy Fund and kicked off the annual fundraiser with a 50/50 Split the Pot Raffle, raising nearly $500. The Sports Legacy committee’s goal is to raise $20,000 through a variety of activities to take place over the next six months with an emphasis placed on the silent auction and raffle to be held at the upcoming NASC Symposium.  Learn more about Running Rebels or how you can help leave a legacy.

At the conclusion of the Market Segment Meetings, the NASC board of directors held their monthly meeting. The agenda included reviewing the summer board action items, hearing updates from the retained earnings and hall of fame ad-hoc committees, sharing ideas and input on the marketing of the association to event rights holders and reviewing the 2014 mid-year membership survey results.  The NASC Board of Directors meets on a monthly basis via conference call and three times a year face-to-face.  If you are interested in applying for the 2015-2016 NASC Board of Directors to help lead the industry’s only not-for-profit association visit http://www.sportscommissions.org/About/Board-of-Directors/Nominations.

Current plans are to hold the 2015 NASC Market Segment Meetings in conjunction with the 2015 USOC SportsLink Conference. Dates and times for next year’s meetings will be announced in winter of 2015.

“Jackass” Sports May Be the Future

February 6, 2014

Longtime NBC Sports anchor Bob Costas caused a bit of a stir in January when, as he was asked about the new winter Olympic sport of Slopestyle, called it “Jackass stuff.”

Now, he wasn’t throwing out a slur, but instead he was making a reference to the Johnny Knoxville “Jackass” movies, where people do unconventional stunts and sometimes (well, most of the time) fall on their faces.

For the record, slopestyle is a competitive event for freestyle snowboarders, as well as skiers that involves an athlete performing tricks in the air as well as on rails and boxes. You’re judged on style and difficulty, just like figure skating.

So what’s the controversy? The Olympics moved into this end of freestyle sports in 1998, when snowboarding and its affiliated competitions were added to the winter Games in Nagano. Not only did the sport bring in a new genre of athlete (think X Games) but just as importantly, a new genre of Olympic fan.

Let’s face it, it’s probably difficult for your 16-year-old to watch curling or ice dancing. But snowboarding might draw him or her to the TV. The Olympics is expanding its audience by expanding its sports.

That’s something that ESPN learned in 1995 when it launched the summer X Games, (Extreme Games) and then the winter version in 1997. A case study of the 2010 X Games in Los Angeles, conducted by the economic research firm Micronomics found that the games had a $50 million economic impact on the city.

Starting in 2014, the summer games will go to Austin, Texas for four years, and while it costs about $20 million to stage the games, the economic impact (along with sponsorships and financial incentives) is seen as a worthwhile investment.

For the winter X Games, the economic impact for the host city has been estimated to have generated $500,000 per day for the games, including the music fests, interactive X-Fest village and other activities.

On a smaller scale, the Dew Tour action sports tour still means a major economic impact for its host areas. The summer Dew Tour brings in an estimated $11 million to $13 million in economic impact, and the Ocean City Dew Tour won the Maryland Economic Engine Tourism Award with an estimated 103,000 attendees making an $11.5 million economic impact to the area and the state.

In addition to the economic impact, being the host of an extreme sports tour or event adds a certain ‘coolness’ factor for the young professionals in your area. For any region trying to retain, and attract, the YPs (see Austin), this kind of event, with its ancillary music, tech and festival components, can pay off.

So Bob Costas may not be wrong in his assessment of “jackass” sports, but the bottom line is that extreme athletes, events and their fans can bring in a significant (if not ‘extreme’) payoff for the host communities.

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications
700 West Pete Rose Way
Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office

(513) 708-5822, mobile
(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com

www.gamedaypr.com

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