Posts Tagged ‘event planning’

News from NASC: Beth Hecquet Resigns

January 30, 2015
Don Schumacher, Executive Director of the NASC announced today that Beth Hecquet, Director of Meetings and Events, has resigned. “Beth has accepted another position here in Cincinnati outside our industry, and we will miss her and the many contributions she has made to the NASC since she was hired in 2002,” he stated.

Hecquet has overseen the growth of the NASC Sports Events Symposium from its tenth anniversary in 2002 through completion of the preparations for this year’s event in Milwaukee. “Beth Hecquet has been a valued employee and we wish her only the best as she pursues a new opportunity,” Schumacher concluded.

When Society and Sports Collide

January 19, 2015

In the wake of the social unrest we’ve seen in Ferguson, Cleveland and New York, athletes have used their national platforms to express their opinions on the incidents—see the St. Louis Rams’ players coming out for team introductions with the “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” pose.

This expression has reached basketball, where professional and college players alike have worn “I Can’t Breathe” shirts, signifying the last words of Eric Gardner, the New York man who died after an officer put him in a chokehold.I cant breathe

And now, a high school basketball tournament in Northern California has been included in the conversation, after a school scheduled to play in the tournament was disinvited because of concerns its players would wear “I Can’t Breathe” shirts during warm-ups.

The athletic director at Mendocino High School was told that neither the boy’s nor the girl’s team would be allowed to participate in the tournament if they wore the shirts.

The boys were reinstated after all but one player agreed not to wear the shirt. Too few girl players agreed to not wear the shirts and were not allowed to play.

No surprise here: The parent of the one boy who decided to sit out the holiday tournament has taken the issue to the American Civil Liberties Union. In a written statement, the principal of the host school, Fort Bragg High School, said the school administrators respected the Mendocino teams “for paying attention to what is going on in the world around them” and that the shirts were being banned as a security precaution.

This isn’t the first, and won’t be the last, time where the world of amateur and youth sports will collide with First Amendment rights and the desire of young athletes to express themselves.

Have you run into similar issues with your events or teams? If so how did you handle the issue and what advice would you have other rights holders or event planners on how to deal with the issue? Give us your thoughts on our NASC Facebook page. We always welcome comments on best practices.

Website Launched for 23rd Annual NASC Symposium

September 10, 2014

The NASC is pleased to announce the launch of the new website for 23rd annual NASC Symposium, scheduled for April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI., hosted by VISIT Milwaukee. The NASC Sports Event Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals. Through a combination of industry-leading educational and business development opportunities, more than 800 Symposium attendees learn how to produce measurable ROI for their organization and advance their careers in the industry.

“The NASC board of directors, staff, and Symposium Committee are all very excited about the way the 2015 NASC Symposium is coming together,” said Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM, Director of Meetings and Events.  “We are taking the feedback provided by our members and previous attendees and letting it guide us every step of the way.  You won’t want to miss it!”

On the website, you can download registration forms, view the preliminary schedule, find hotel & travel information, learn about sponsorship opportunities, and more.  Online registration will open for NASC members at the end of September.

Complete details are available at www.SportsCommissions.org/Symposium.

 

About the NASC

As the only trade association for the sports tourism industry, the National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC) is the most trusted resource for sports commissions, convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs), and sports event owners.

Since its establishment in 1992, the NASC has been committed to increasing the effectiveness of nearly 700 member organizations and more than 2,000 sports tourism professionals.

Our promise is to deliver quality education, ample networking opportunities, and exceptional event management and marketing know-how to our members and to protect the integrity of the industry.FINAL INFOGRAPHIC_091014

 

 

Bowling for Dollars: Economic Impact Considerations for College Football Bowl Games

January 3, 2014

The outgoing president of Ball State University, Dr. Jo Ann Gora, once said that the only ones who make money from a bowl game is the host city. An economic impact study from last January’s Orange Bowl and BCS Championship games shows, that’s not too far from the truth, at least for the on-their-way-out BCS bowls.

According to a study by the Conventions Sports & Leisure International group shows that the 2012-2013 Orange Bowl Festival, which included the annual Orange Bowl game as well as the BCS Championship game, helped generate a $298.1 million economic impact for South Florida.

Perhaps more significant is that number is nearly 50 percent more than the economic impact generated the last time South Florida was the host for both the Orange Bowl and the BCS National Championship games, in 2008-09. It’s also close to the $333 million economic impact of the 2010 Super Bowl played at Sun Life Stadium, according to the South Florida Super Bowl Committee.

The study cited an improved economy as one reason for the jump in spending; another was the increased interest in the two teams involved in the BCS title game in 2013, Alabama and Notre Dame.

The study breaks down the economic impact with Orange Bowl events generating $127 million in new direct spending, $224 million in total new economic output, $4.9 million in new taxes and creating approximately 2,400 new full and part-time jobs that generated $81.4 million in personal earnings. The total economic impact figure includes $74.1 million in media exposure value for South Florida.

That’s what one of the BCS bowls can mean to a community, but what about some of the lower tiered post-season college games? They can impact a city’s bottom line, as well. For example, the Las Vegas Bowl, played just before Christmas at UNLV’s stadium, brings in around 37,000 fans who generate some $18 million in non-gaming economic impact during one of the quietest tourist weeks of the year on The Strip.

And look at the finances surrounding the Heart of Dallas bowl January 1 at the Cotton Bowl pitting UNLV against North Texas. UNLV expects to receive $600,000 from its conference for participating in the game but is responsible for selling $400,000 in tickets (5,333 tickets at $75 apiece). That leaves $200,000 for the expense of sending the team and university officials to Dallas for the game. But it’s been 13 years since UNLV has been in a bowl game, and despite the financial challenges, UNLV Athletic Director Tina Kunzer-Murphy said she never considered turning down the bid.

“It’s a national network and we’re going to be the first game out,” Kunzer-Murphy said. “It’s going to be a three-hour advertisement for the university, and that’s priceless.”

For the Dallas area, the bowl game has its own payday. This bowl game, run as a not-for-profit, brings in just under $20 million in economic impact, according to the Dallas Convention and Visitors Bureau. The traditional Cotton Bowl Classic, before it moved to Arlington, Texas, was $29.8 million.

Add in the national exposure that the host cities receive during a bowl game, and it’s easy to see how games from the Belk Bowl to Music City Bowl to the Pinstripe Bowl continue to pop up and thrive: Schools love the exposure, and the host cities love the visitors during traditionally slow tourism times. And that’s a big win for both sides.

Source: http://www.bizjournals.com/southflorida/news/2013/11/01/orange-bowl-bcs-championship-scored.html?page=all

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications
700 West Pete Rose Way
Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

NASC Playbook – Summer 2013 is now available

July 23, 2013

We are pleased to release our third edition of the NASC Playbook, our quarterly digital publication. was designed to keep our members up-to-date on the latest happenings with your association as well as to share best practices and industry trends that will help you get your share of the sports event industry.

NASC Playbook Summer 2013

Inside this Issue:

– Beth’s Top Ten Tips for Responding to the NASC Symposium RFP
– National Association of Sports Commissions annual symposium celebrates record growth in 2013
– Sports Tourism: A State of the Industry Report
– NASC helps members prepare for the NCAA Championship Bid Process
– NASC Unveils Enhancements to Economic Impact Calculator

View the Summer 2013 NASC Playbook. 

 

If you have stories you’d like to have us feature in a future edition, contact Elizabeth Chaney, Director of Membership and Marketing, at Elizabeth@SportsCommissions.org.

NASC Call for Proposals

October 23, 2012

Are you interested at presenting a breakouts session, or know someone who might be, at the upcoming 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium, April 22-25, 2013 in Louisville, KY.  If so check out the recently released Call for Proposals form.

The 2013 breakouts sessions are being collectively called “Engaging Education Sessions” with the aim of allowing attendees to drive their own learning experience by extracting the collective knowledge from industry experts and the audience.  There will be three sets of four concurrent sessions  (12 sessions in total) and each meeting room will have its own theme:

  1. Room 1: Event Management (for example: Local Organizing Committee (LOC); working with municipality, county, state governments; event insurance; contract negotiations; volunteer recruitment, training, recognition; preparing for an event; etc.)
  2. Room 2: Sales & Marketing (for example: sponsor development/fulfillment; membership recruitment; media partnerships; ticket sales; marketing plans; essentials of good salesmanship; effective promotional strategies, etc.)
  3. Room 3: Financial (for example: determining ROI; revenue sources for not-for-profits; economic impact; etc.)
  4. Room 4: Executive (for example: strategic planning; leadership and management skills; board relations; etc.)

Deadline to submit is Friday, November 9th.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 25, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 24, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

 

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

Managing Expectations in the Sports Event Industry

August 7, 2012

In this short video, NASC Executive Director Don Schumacher, CSEE, discusses what it takes to be successful in the sports event industry … and that the best place to start is by managing expectations.

Here with just a few of our closest friends

August 3, 2012

As our Olympic Games journey comes to an end, we finally made it to where the games began – Olympic Park.  In order to access the Park, either a ticket for a venue within the area or a day-pass that had to be purchased months in advance is required.  At first, this made no sense to me as many sponsors have interactive exhibits here, and the Merchandise Mega Store takes up a good portion of the area.  Furthermore, it is a great place to people watch.  However, upon spending a few minutes here, I understand the method to what I assumed was madness.  I am guesstimating there will be upwards of 400,000 people here today. If they had opened the doors to everyone, it would be a security nightmare, nearly impossible to enjoy and just plain crazy.  It has been a great trip and I look forward to sharing the nearly 2,000 photos I have taken.

 

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

Where is all the Merchandise?

July 31, 2012

I came to the London 2012 Olympic Games ready to spend a good amount of pound sterlings on goodies for me, my family and our friends at home.  The problem is I can’t find an official retail outlet!  I came with the assumption there would be a make-shift merchandise shop around every street corner, but we have only found one so far, in the Greenwich Arena (site of the gymnastics competitions). They had sold out of many items on day two of the gymnastics competition and were limited in sizes for what they did have for sale.  I was shocked!  We then headed to badminton that afternoon at Wembley Arena, clear on the other side of London and a ways out, so I guessed they’d have another store with more stock. Again I was disappointed.  The 10 minute shop from the Wembley tube station to the Arena was lined with shops for food and merchandise, but as you can see in the sad picture I took, all of the merchandise shops were closed up tight.  And this is only day two of the games!  My only thought is, “What were they thinking?!”

Beth Hecquet, CMP

Director of Meetings and Events

NASC