Posts Tagged ‘facilities’

Getting the most of the venues you have

September 29, 2015

Fenway Park in Boston has been the home for football, for concerts, for hockey, and now, this winter, it will be the home for big-air snowboarding. “Big Air at Fenway” will bring in top winter extreme athletes to compete on a 140-foot snow ramp inside the park. With the winter Boston had last season, having enough snow or cold shouldn’t be a problem. If it is, organizers say they’ll just truck in enough snow for the athletes.

“I think it’s more that we see Fenway as a community gathering place, and doing high-profile, blue-chip events outside of baseball season a couple times a year is an appealing thing for the community,” according to Red Sox and Fenway Sports Management President Sam Kennedy. “A lot of them are a return to a past. Soccer had happened way back in the early part of the century, and the Patriots even played at Fenway and Boston College played at Fenway way back, so I think we’ve been inspired by Fenway’s history and actually bringing these events back in terms of a return to the past.”

More and more venues are getting more and more use out of their facilities by opening them up to new ideas and new sports. Yes, sometimes it’s a pure gimmick, as with the U.S. Synchronized Swim Team performing routines in what was called the largest swim tank in Times Square history last week, but it’s another way to expose what may be a niche sport to more people. You can bet Fenway will be sold out for the Big Air event.

(Boston, MA, 09/22/15) Fenway Sports Management (FSM) and the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA) during a press conference announce a big air ski and snowboard competition that will take place at Fenway Park in February.  A drawing of the massive snow ramp within the park on Tuesday,  September  22, 2015.  Staff photo by Matt Stone

Drawing courtesy of Fenway Sports Management

Finding funding: Sometimes it comes to you

July 28, 2015

So you have a great idea for a new event for your facility: It would bring in hundreds of athletes who would stay multiple days and bring in thousands of dollars to the local economy.

Or, you’d like to expand your facility, adding fields or courts, which would allow you to bring in bigger, better events. All sounds good, but the bottom line, as they say, is the bottom line: How to pay for all of this?

It’s a universal issue that all organizations, rights holders, facility operators, high school and college athletic departments or team managers face. You may have great ideas, but you don’t have the resources to fund them. Where does the money come from?

As a sports corporation or CVB, you might ask your sales staff to acquire more sponsorships or partnerships. (what your sales staff says after you leave the room, well, that’s out of our control)

We already know that more colleges and universities, especially those outside the “Power Five” conferences, are looking to beer sales at games to help fund the athletic department. A year ago, there were 21 on-campus football stadiums where any fan of legal age could grab a brew. That’s more than twice as many as five years ago.

Troy University Athletic Director John Hartwell estimated that beer would account for $200,000 in commissions for the season. According to its contract with concessionaire Sodexo, Troy receives 43 percent of gross beer sales at its 30,000-seat stadium, or better than $2 for every $5 beer.

But sometimes the money comes to you, through an endowment. A trend that started in the Ivy League and spread to other schools is now becoming the new way to save that school from paying a salary.

The most recent example? Richard Corbett, a Florida real-estate executive who served as the business manager of Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign, gave $35 million to the University of Notre Dame, from which he graduated in 1960.

Of the total, $25 million will go for a new building to house the anthropology and psychology departments and a digital-media center. He also directed $10 million of the gift to endow the university’s head football coach position.

In another case, Xavier’s men’s basketball coach, Chris Mack, is now the Sedler Family Men’s Head Basketball Coach after Tom and Genny Sedler provided Xavier with the endowment to fund Coach Mack’s salary. The endowment basically allows the university to take the money that would go to salaries and use it somewhere else.

The academic side has been doing this for decades, as donors have funded the “so-and-so-chair for chemical engineering research” at universities around the country. So how can you get the endowment idea to work for you?

It might come in the form of a civic-minded philanthropist who wants to fund a new soccer or basketball complex, or a company that can use foundation dollars to help a community cause while getting its name out in public.

This is a time we all have to be creative to find sponsorship and partnership dollars. Doing a form of an endowment might be the way to get your project from the drawing board, into the community.

ball field

Website Launched for 23rd Annual NASC Symposium

September 10, 2014

The NASC is pleased to announce the launch of the new website for 23rd annual NASC Symposium, scheduled for April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI., hosted by VISIT Milwaukee. The NASC Sports Event Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals. Through a combination of industry-leading educational and business development opportunities, more than 800 Symposium attendees learn how to produce measurable ROI for their organization and advance their careers in the industry.

“The NASC board of directors, staff, and Symposium Committee are all very excited about the way the 2015 NASC Symposium is coming together,” said Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM, Director of Meetings and Events.  “We are taking the feedback provided by our members and previous attendees and letting it guide us every step of the way.  You won’t want to miss it!”

On the website, you can download registration forms, view the preliminary schedule, find hotel & travel information, learn about sponsorship opportunities, and more.  Online registration will open for NASC members at the end of September.

Complete details are available at www.SportsCommissions.org/Symposium.

 

About the NASC

As the only trade association for the sports tourism industry, the National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC) is the most trusted resource for sports commissions, convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs), and sports event owners.

Since its establishment in 1992, the NASC has been committed to increasing the effectiveness of nearly 700 member organizations and more than 2,000 sports tourism professionals.

Our promise is to deliver quality education, ample networking opportunities, and exceptional event management and marketing know-how to our members and to protect the integrity of the industry.FINAL INFOGRAPHIC_091014

 

 

NASC Call for Proposals

October 23, 2012

Are you interested at presenting a breakouts session, or know someone who might be, at the upcoming 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium, April 22-25, 2013 in Louisville, KY.  If so check out the recently released Call for Proposals form.

The 2013 breakouts sessions are being collectively called “Engaging Education Sessions” with the aim of allowing attendees to drive their own learning experience by extracting the collective knowledge from industry experts and the audience.  There will be three sets of four concurrent sessions  (12 sessions in total) and each meeting room will have its own theme:

  1. Room 1: Event Management (for example: Local Organizing Committee (LOC); working with municipality, county, state governments; event insurance; contract negotiations; volunteer recruitment, training, recognition; preparing for an event; etc.)
  2. Room 2: Sales & Marketing (for example: sponsor development/fulfillment; membership recruitment; media partnerships; ticket sales; marketing plans; essentials of good salesmanship; effective promotional strategies, etc.)
  3. Room 3: Financial (for example: determining ROI; revenue sources for not-for-profits; economic impact; etc.)
  4. Room 4: Executive (for example: strategic planning; leadership and management skills; board relations; etc.)

Deadline to submit is Friday, November 9th.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 25, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 24, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

 

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

Managing Expectations in the Sports Event Industry

August 7, 2012

In this short video, NASC Executive Director Don Schumacher, CSEE, discusses what it takes to be successful in the sports event industry … and that the best place to start is by managing expectations.

Here with just a few of our closest friends

August 3, 2012

As our Olympic Games journey comes to an end, we finally made it to where the games began – Olympic Park.  In order to access the Park, either a ticket for a venue within the area or a day-pass that had to be purchased months in advance is required.  At first, this made no sense to me as many sponsors have interactive exhibits here, and the Merchandise Mega Store takes up a good portion of the area.  Furthermore, it is a great place to people watch.  However, upon spending a few minutes here, I understand the method to what I assumed was madness.  I am guesstimating there will be upwards of 400,000 people here today. If they had opened the doors to everyone, it would be a security nightmare, nearly impossible to enjoy and just plain crazy.  It has been a great trip and I look forward to sharing the nearly 2,000 photos I have taken.

 

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

What is with all of this Pink?!

August 1, 2012

A few days before we left for the Games, a friend posted a picture of the Olympics gymnastics competition floor, and it was bright pink – I mean BRIGHT pink.  I shared the picture on Facebook with the comment “wow, that’s a lot of pink”, and a few friends posted things like “It hurts my eyes” and “I am sure the men love that”.  However, now that we have seen a gymnastics competition on that bright pink floor (and have learned that pink is the color scheme of the games), I think it was a brilliant move by the LOCOG (London Organizing Committee Olympic Games).  Everything, and I mean everything a spectator would need to be able to identify, is pink – flooring at many of the venues, signage, volunteers uniforms, the big foam fingers that the “directional” volunteers hold to point spectators in the right direction, barrier coverings, etc.  It is so easy to identify Olympic Games features as they are all pink and stand out.  My overwhelming opinion of the London 2012 Games is how organised and well thought out they are – at least from a spectator’s perspective.

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

Where is all the Merchandise?

July 31, 2012

I came to the London 2012 Olympic Games ready to spend a good amount of pound sterlings on goodies for me, my family and our friends at home.  The problem is I can’t find an official retail outlet!  I came with the assumption there would be a make-shift merchandise shop around every street corner, but we have only found one so far, in the Greenwich Arena (site of the gymnastics competitions). They had sold out of many items on day two of the gymnastics competition and were limited in sizes for what they did have for sale.  I was shocked!  We then headed to badminton that afternoon at Wembley Arena, clear on the other side of London and a ways out, so I guessed they’d have another store with more stock. Again I was disappointed.  The 10 minute shop from the Wembley tube station to the Arena was lined with shops for food and merchandise, but as you can see in the sad picture I took, all of the merchandise shops were closed up tight.  And this is only day two of the games!  My only thought is, “What were they thinking?!”

Beth Hecquet, CMP

Director of Meetings and Events

NASC

Tomorrow’s News, Today (NASC Sports Event Symposium, 04/18/12)

April 19, 2012

 

Each day of the 2012 National Association of Sports Commissions Annual Symposium, we will publish a daily blog with highlights from the programs and activities.

Get Social with NASC: #NASC12

Follow all of the news from the 2012 Symposium on Twitter @NASC_News, using the hashtag: #NASC12

Check us out on Facebook @National Association of Sports Commissions

“Heard” on the Show Floor

Talty O’Connor kicked off the day with some impressive numbers on the state of the sports industry. The number of U.S. Sports events grew by 8% in 2011, according to its research, but perhaps more startling, 7 of 10 youngsters quit sports before the age of 14. If the sports industry can find a way to cut that number to even 5 out of 10, the sports events industry would grow by $2 billion a year. Speaking of youth sports, just over 2% of high schools now offer physical education classes.

Keynote Speaker

The NASC welcomed ESPN’s Karl Ravech as the luncheon speaker, highlighting his time atBaseball Tonight but also talking about how sports affects so many lives. “Sports is reality television, but it’s real,” Ravech reminded the conference crowd. The one example he gave: Last year, one of the Little League World Series games drew a crowd of 41,848, a larger crowd than many MLB games.

Ravech also talked about sports branding, and how it relates to ESPN. “We try to create ‘YouTube’ moments,” he said, “looking for ways of how we can ‘trend’ that day in social media. Understanding those moments make us better.”

Ice Cream for iPad?

Our emcee Jon Petz created an impromtu competitive eating event in a break during yesterday’s meeting. Check out the video on our Facebook page @NationalAssociationofSportsCommisions.

Coming Up

As the NASC Symposium comes to an end, Thursday will be awards day as the top sports organizations will be recognized for their work. Join us for an exciting day at the NASC Symposium!