Posts Tagged ‘hospitality community’

Room Block in Louisville

November 1, 2012

Every year at the NASC Symposium we have various sessions on how to track hotel pickup.  We all dream of the event where every team stays within their hotel room block and tracking is a breeze. The same can be said of our association’s annual gathering.  We have the opportunity to support NASC by staying at the host hotel (Louisville Marriott Downtown) or the overflow hotel (Hyatt Regency Louisville).  And both hotels are steps from the Kentucky International Convention Center!  Check out the Hotels page on the NASC Symposium website to book your room. See you in Louisville…..

Heath Aucoin, CSEE

Event Manager/Sports Sales Manager

SMG/Jackson Convention Complex

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 25, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 24, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

 

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

Managing Expectations in the Sports Event Industry

August 7, 2012

In this short video, NASC Executive Director Don Schumacher, CSEE, discusses what it takes to be successful in the sports event industry … and that the best place to start is by managing expectations.

Here with just a few of our closest friends

August 3, 2012

As our Olympic Games journey comes to an end, we finally made it to where the games began – Olympic Park.  In order to access the Park, either a ticket for a venue within the area or a day-pass that had to be purchased months in advance is required.  At first, this made no sense to me as many sponsors have interactive exhibits here, and the Merchandise Mega Store takes up a good portion of the area.  Furthermore, it is a great place to people watch.  However, upon spending a few minutes here, I understand the method to what I assumed was madness.  I am guesstimating there will be upwards of 400,000 people here today. If they had opened the doors to everyone, it would be a security nightmare, nearly impossible to enjoy and just plain crazy.  It has been a great trip and I look forward to sharing the nearly 2,000 photos I have taken.

 

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

It’s Fun and Games

August 2, 2012

Greater London has caught the Olympic spirit. Banners are up on houses, businesses and streets. Free and pay activities have been created and heavily promoted such as BT Live in Hyde Park.  Large screens have been erected at Hampton Court Palace grounds to watch competitions.  Although there has been quite a fuss about tickets being listed as unavailable even though many seats have been empty at major events (you’ve probably seen them on TV), there are still plenty of ways to participate and catch the Olympic spirit.

Olympic Flags

BT Live

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

What is with all of this Pink?!

August 1, 2012

A few days before we left for the Games, a friend posted a picture of the Olympics gymnastics competition floor, and it was bright pink – I mean BRIGHT pink.  I shared the picture on Facebook with the comment “wow, that’s a lot of pink”, and a few friends posted things like “It hurts my eyes” and “I am sure the men love that”.  However, now that we have seen a gymnastics competition on that bright pink floor (and have learned that pink is the color scheme of the games), I think it was a brilliant move by the LOCOG (London Organizing Committee Olympic Games).  Everything, and I mean everything a spectator would need to be able to identify, is pink – flooring at many of the venues, signage, volunteers uniforms, the big foam fingers that the “directional” volunteers hold to point spectators in the right direction, barrier coverings, etc.  It is so easy to identify Olympic Games features as they are all pink and stand out.  My overwhelming opinion of the London 2012 Games is how organised and well thought out they are – at least from a spectator’s perspective.

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

Where is all the Merchandise?

July 31, 2012

I came to the London 2012 Olympic Games ready to spend a good amount of pound sterlings on goodies for me, my family and our friends at home.  The problem is I can’t find an official retail outlet!  I came with the assumption there would be a make-shift merchandise shop around every street corner, but we have only found one so far, in the Greenwich Arena (site of the gymnastics competitions). They had sold out of many items on day two of the gymnastics competition and were limited in sizes for what they did have for sale.  I was shocked!  We then headed to badminton that afternoon at Wembley Arena, clear on the other side of London and a ways out, so I guessed they’d have another store with more stock. Again I was disappointed.  The 10 minute shop from the Wembley tube station to the Arena was lined with shops for food and merchandise, but as you can see in the sad picture I took, all of the merchandise shops were closed up tight.  And this is only day two of the games!  My only thought is, “What were they thinking?!”

Beth Hecquet, CMP

Director of Meetings and Events

NASC

Volunteers a Plenty

July 30, 2012

Upon our arrival in the UK in the early morning hours, we had our first taste of the Olympic spirit within steps of departing the plane. Two volunteers dressed in their bright pink and purple shirts stood at the top of the jet bridge with a welcome sign. A few steps further down the path to baggage reclaim (as they call it at London’s Heathrow Airport) we encountered scores more of friendly and helpful volunteers. And this was only the beginning. On every street corner where Olympic spectators could wander, they will find at least two volunteers; at every tube, bus and train station, there are at least two volunteers as well (and many times upwards of six to eight). All are there to make getting in and around London and the Games as easy and stress free as possible. In the London 2012 official programme (spelling is correct, this is the UK) they make sure to state there are 70,000 volunteers organized by the LOCOG (London Organizing Committee Olympic Games) there to help. And help they have, as well as given spectators a welcome feeling to a city that can be very overwhelming.

Beth Hecquet, CMP
Director of Meetings and Events
NASC

NASC Member Cities Host 17 of 19 Olympic Trials

July 12, 2012

Recently we had occasion to take a look at the cities that hosted Olympic trials events in preparation for the London Games. As we did, we realized our members have played a huge role in helping to qualify and prepare our athletes.

Of the 19 Olympic sports that held trials for the 26 sports on this year’s program (7 sports select their teams without trials events), 17 were held in NASC member cities. Both of the exceptions are former members where a staff person left the organization prior to this year. This equals 89 percent of the sports holding trials.

Since some of those sports (aquatics, for example) have four sports, there were actually 31 different trials events for the 19 sports. Swimming, diving, synchronized swimming and water polo held their events in four different cities.

NASC members hosted 29 of the 31 different disciplines within the sports, or 94 percent of all of the trials events held for the 19 sports on the program for the 2012 Olympic Games.

It could not be any clearer: NASC members play an absolutely essential role in these events.

We are very proud of each host city and look forward to seeing the athletes who qualified medal for the USA in London!

– Don

How to follow up after the NASC Symposium

May 3, 2012

You are back in your office after a great week at the NASC Symposium in Hartford.  Now what?

Here are some tips that we hope you find helpful:

You told your appointment you were going to follow up – do it.  Send the prospective client the information they were looking for in a timeline as described during the appointment.  Be sure to send it to them in the format they wish to receive it.  You should only bid on events that fit your community’s profile.  Make sure that the event matches up with the right time of year and in an appropriate climate setting.

Hopefully, you took good notes and are following up at the prescribed time.  If your appointment said they will be issuing RFPs in the fall, make yourself a note and follow up at that time.  Use your data management system or Outlook calendar to prompt you when the ImageRFP should be ready for distribution.

If this year or next does not work for either of you, let your client know.  Ask them when your area of the country would be considered again if you cannot bid on the next opening.

Follow up with phone calls and if you have to leave a voicemail, be sure to also send an e-mail.  People may respond better (and more promptly) to e-mail than voicemails, so multiple points of contact may be best.  When you leave a voicemail, let them know you have also e-mailed them and vice-versa.

OK, so you met with your appointment and you have agreed that you are not a good fit. It happens.  Still you will likely see them at another show and you should re-introduce yourself. You never know, maybe they have added events that are a good fit for you now.  If the event is not going to be a good fit, ask them if they have any other events that could work in your community.  Remember we are in the business of sports tourism.  This includes business meetings, in addition to competitions.  Ask if they hold business meetings or conferences, if you cannot assist them with an event.

Keep your account contact person or database updated.  People get promoted and people change jobs.  The person you met at this year’s Symposium may not be the contact person next year.  Be sure to ask your contact if they are still the key contact for a particular event.

Remember the key to selling is building relationships.  The more face time and personal contact you make with a prospective client will make the sales process easier over time and help you to succeed in the industry.

Good luck!

John Gibbons, CSEE                                        Ron Eifert, CSEE

Executive Director                                          Sr. Sales/Sports Manager

Rhode Island Sports Commission             Dayton/Montgomery County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Need more expert advice?  Register now for the upcoming webinar, “You’re Back From the Symposium, Now What” which is scheduled for May 22.