Posts Tagged ‘industry trends’

The Future of Football

December 8, 2015

Before the Christmas release of the film, “Concussion,” the researcher whose work is the basis for the movie, Bennet Omalu, wrote a New York Times op-ed piece that appeared Monday, in which he says that children under age 18 should not be allowed to play full-contact football.

AFI FEST 2015 Presented By Audi Centerpiece Gala Premiere Of Columbia Pictures' "Concussion" - Arrivals

HOLLYWOOD, CA – NOVEMBER 10: Bennet Omalu attends the Centerpiece Gala Premiere of Columbia Pictures’ “Concussion” during AFI FEST 2015 presented by Audi at the TCL Chinese Theatre on November 10, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Omalu likens the dangers of football to other known dangers like smoking, asbestos and alcohol, His argument is, we learned of the dangers of each, and now have education and, in some cases, laws in place to protect people from their misuse. We know about the dangers of football, he argues, and it is now time to protect young people from the head trauma that we’ve seen in older players.

Omalu is the first person to link repeated concussions and head trauma to CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative condition blamed in part for the deaths of a number of high profile NFL players, including Junior Seau and Mike Webster.

In the article, Omalu makes the point “that repetitive blows to the head in high-impact contact sports like football, ice hockey, mixed-martial arts and boxing place athletes at high risk of permanent brain damage. …Why, then, do we continue to intentionally expose our children to this risk?”

In the short term, Omalu’s proposal would change youth football to a non-contact, touch or flag football game. In the long term, though, eliminating youth football as it is played at higher levels would effectively kill the college and professional game in the United States. If youngsters don’t grow up playing the game at it exists now, there’s a slim to none chance they will pick it up when they are “of age.”

In the wake of the New York Times piece, former college and NFL quarterback Danny Kanell tweeted that “the war on football is real.” For youth football organizers, it’s time to look realistically at the dangers and work hard to make the game safer.

 

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now

November 18, 2015

Mark your calendars now! We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below, and reserve your spot today!



Tips for Building Community Relationships
Best Practices Webinar
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Building relationships within your community is essential to the success of sporting events you host. From venue support, event management, volunteer recruitment, fundraising and sponsorships, your local community holds the resources that rights holders look for when awarding events. Join Bonny Bernat of Visit Winston-Salem as she shares best practices used in hosting events in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. If you are unable to join us on the 24th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



USA Triathlon

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Thursday, December 17, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Join Brian D’Amico, National Events Senior Manager, USA Triathlon, as he discusses USA Triathlon and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 17th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Contact the Member Services Department if you have any questions.

Sports Tourism: A State of the Industry Report

May 18, 2015

At last month’s NASC Symposium, Dr. Lisa Delpy Neirotti from The George Washington University shared the findings from the 2014 Sports Tourism: The State of the Industry Report to the NASC membership.

The report which can be found on the NASC website provides a helpful reference for our members to share with their colleagues, rights holders and funders. The report provides the following key indicators:

• Industry at a Glance
• Industry Performance Indicators
• Operating Conditions
• Methodology of the Research

Overall, the report shares good news for our industry with visitor spending up three percent over last year at $8.96 billion and total visitors entertained in 2014 was 25.65 million.

Among those NASC members surveyed, the top three community priorities were:

• Visitor spending
• Marketing the region
• Supporting local sports franchises and venues

Once you have reviewed the report, we encourage you to share the link on your website, social media pages and with an email to your supporters and community partners.

2015 Industry Trends

February 5, 2015

Going to talk today about some trends that we see in the industry in the coming year.  And I think one of the most interesting trends for those of us that have been in the sports commission, and visitor and convention bureau industries, is the fact that park and recreation departments are becoming increasingly interested in membership in the NASC.  I find that particularly interesting, personally because we’re discovering that many park and recreation department actually create, promote, and run their own events, which makes them in the final analysis perhaps even more similar to a sports commission in many cases than a convention and visitors bureau where in the latter case there may be a focus on room nights, which is something we are going to talk about in just a minute or two.  But we welcome additional park and recreation departments to our membership.  We are at something in the range of 20 departments now, and we will be taking some steps during the year to increase that number, because they bring a lot to the table in terms of the dialogue and they’re truly qualified as active members of our association, because they’re so involved with the production of their own events.  So that would be a first trend.

The second trend starts with a question; I wonder how many of us think, what would be the case in terms of room rebates if we didn’t have a focus on room nights?  I wonder if there isn’t a direct tie in between the emphasis that a destination places and the importance that a destination places on developing room nights through sports above and beyond all other considerations.  And if by doing that, that doesn’t encourage event owners to feel that not only can there be room rebates, but the room rebates that could perhaps overtime and with a change in destinations continue to go up.  I remember being surprised when rebates were in the five to ten dollar range; I am shocked that we have managed to get in the 30+ dollar range in some cases around the country.  So I think a one of the cost on a focus on room nights could very well be increasing room rebates.  And from that stand point I think it’s good to look back 20 years ago, when sports commissions were the primary way to bid on events.  These was a tremendous focus on quality of life.  Destinations were looking for events that were going to make something exciting happen in their communities, and yes television exposure was very important.  But in the final analysis doing things like having the USA Volleyball National Women’s Team come to your destination and play another international squad with no visitor spending, was a real focus of a sports commission.  And that kind of focus does not encourage event owners to pursue room rebates, let alone commissions.  Now one the major event owners in the United States, the NCAA, moved to a commission on all room nights for all NCAA National Championships, across all divisions in 2014.  That was a seismic shift and we’ll see how that works out for the NCAA and for the destinations.  And importantly for the very people that are attending these championships, which in the final analysis are the people, all of us are supposed to be more concerned about.

And then I think finally, there is a trend in our industry that has come up at the latter part of 2014, there is a shrinkage and or consolidation of some of the events that take place every year in the sports travel industry.  The United States Olympic Committee recently made a decision to assign the rights to the SportsLink congress to the Connect Sports people, and we’re have to see how that works out.  That is a not-for-profit transfer of rights to a for profit, I rather suspect that that’ll be reflected in the cost of attending that conference, but it’s a market driven economy and we’ll see what happens.

So for the coming year, we see more park and recreation departments getting engaged in the industry, we see this puzzle about room rebates and commissions continual need to be something that we all have to focus on, and finally there some shifts and changes in industry conferences.  I can tell you that the NASC has decided to keep its independence, but we are also going to attend each of the industry conferences this year.  Thanks for your attention.

 

Website Launched for 23rd Annual NASC Symposium

September 10, 2014

The NASC is pleased to announce the launch of the new website for 23rd annual NASC Symposium, scheduled for April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI., hosted by VISIT Milwaukee. The NASC Sports Event Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals. Through a combination of industry-leading educational and business development opportunities, more than 800 Symposium attendees learn how to produce measurable ROI for their organization and advance their careers in the industry.

“The NASC board of directors, staff, and Symposium Committee are all very excited about the way the 2015 NASC Symposium is coming together,” said Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM, Director of Meetings and Events.  “We are taking the feedback provided by our members and previous attendees and letting it guide us every step of the way.  You won’t want to miss it!”

On the website, you can download registration forms, view the preliminary schedule, find hotel & travel information, learn about sponsorship opportunities, and more.  Online registration will open for NASC members at the end of September.

Complete details are available at www.SportsCommissions.org/Symposium.

 

About the NASC

As the only trade association for the sports tourism industry, the National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC) is the most trusted resource for sports commissions, convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs), and sports event owners.

Since its establishment in 1992, the NASC has been committed to increasing the effectiveness of nearly 700 member organizations and more than 2,000 sports tourism professionals.

Our promise is to deliver quality education, ample networking opportunities, and exceptional event management and marketing know-how to our members and to protect the integrity of the industry.FINAL INFOGRAPHIC_091014

 

 

What NASC Means To Me

November 13, 2012

“I would not have a job in the sports travel industry if it weren’t for the National Association of Sports Commissions!” 

This is a pretty strong statement, but true!  I was hired by the Cedar Rapids Area CVB to pursue convention and meeting business.  After experiencing success for several years, our city began losing its share of this market in the late 1990s when our competition began building shiny, new convention centers.   The largest facility Cedar Rapids could offer the meetings market was a hotel connected to a 6000-seat arena.  During this same time period, our city began developing a new minor league baseball stadium, 20-field soccer complex, and ice arena for the benefit of local residents.

As I was struggling to adjust to the changing landscape of the meetings market, I became aware of the National Association of Sports Commissions through Denny Gann who was President of the Sioux City Sports Commission, one of NASC’s twelve founding organizations.  He gave a series of seminars describing the sports market as a new, emerging market segment.  He explained how hosting a sports event was very different from hosting a convention; and he encouraged membership in a young organization, the National Association of Sports Commissions.

The Cedar Rapids Area CVB became a member of NASC on February 1, 1997, and I attended my first Symposium that April in San Antonio.   I felt like a sponge as I attended one session after another and gained new knowledge from other attendees.  As I absorbed the information shared, I realized that Cedar Rapids could be a legitimate contender for tournaments!

In the fall of 1997 I was ready to bid on my first national tournament.  I prepared my proposal but wanted a more knowledgeable individual to review my work.  Once again NASC came to my rescue!  I asked Denny Gann to mentor me.  As a result of his suggestions, I was able to strengthen my proposal; and Cedar Rapids was awarded the 1999 AAU Taekwondo Youth and Adult National Championship!

The story doesn’t end there, however.  In July of 1998, 1000 athletes and their families spent 5 days in Cedar Rapids competing in the tournament, exploring the area, and spending money at our restaurants, hotels and retail outlets.   Our city council was so pleased with the economic benefits generated, they gave our CVB funding to add a full-time person dedicated to attracting more sports events to our area!

Today NASC continues to be as vibrant and important to me as it was 14 years ago.  Volunteering on committees has given me more insight into the industry and more professional contacts.  I continue to learn from my peers at Symposium and at Market Segment Meetings.  I am very proud of my CSEE and the respect my clients have for the designation.  I find that the appointments with sports organizers at Symposium and the information about their events on the website are invaluable!

I urge you to take advantage of all that the National Association of Sports Commission has to offer!  I promise it will positively enhance your success in this industry!

Mary Lee Malmberg, CSEE
Director of Sports Tourism
Cedar Rapids Area CVB

Mary Lee joined the Cedar Rapids Area Convention & Visitors Bureau in 1989. The bureau’s Sports Tourism Department was established in 2000 and Mary Lee has served as the Director of Sports Tourism since that time. The Sports Tourism Department has helped bring a number of state, regional and national competitions to the Cedar Rapids area including the American Legion World Series and NCAA Division II and III National Wrestling Championships. Mary Lee has attended each NASC Sports Symposium since 1997 and has served on the Member Mentoring Committee since 2001. Mary Lee received her Certified Sports Event Executive certification in April 2006. She has served on NASC’s Board of Directors since 2008.

Room Block in Louisville

November 1, 2012

Every year at the NASC Symposium we have various sessions on how to track hotel pickup.  We all dream of the event where every team stays within their hotel room block and tracking is a breeze. The same can be said of our association’s annual gathering.  We have the opportunity to support NASC by staying at the host hotel (Louisville Marriott Downtown) or the overflow hotel (Hyatt Regency Louisville).  And both hotels are steps from the Kentucky International Convention Center!  Check out the Hotels page on the NASC Symposium website to book your room. See you in Louisville…..

Heath Aucoin, CSEE

Event Manager/Sports Sales Manager

SMG/Jackson Convention Complex

NASC Call for Proposals

October 23, 2012

Are you interested at presenting a breakouts session, or know someone who might be, at the upcoming 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium, April 22-25, 2013 in Louisville, KY.  If so check out the recently released Call for Proposals form.

The 2013 breakouts sessions are being collectively called “Engaging Education Sessions” with the aim of allowing attendees to drive their own learning experience by extracting the collective knowledge from industry experts and the audience.  There will be three sets of four concurrent sessions  (12 sessions in total) and each meeting room will have its own theme:

  1. Room 1: Event Management (for example: Local Organizing Committee (LOC); working with municipality, county, state governments; event insurance; contract negotiations; volunteer recruitment, training, recognition; preparing for an event; etc.)
  2. Room 2: Sales & Marketing (for example: sponsor development/fulfillment; membership recruitment; media partnerships; ticket sales; marketing plans; essentials of good salesmanship; effective promotional strategies, etc.)
  3. Room 3: Financial (for example: determining ROI; revenue sources for not-for-profits; economic impact; etc.)
  4. Room 4: Executive (for example: strategic planning; leadership and management skills; board relations; etc.)

Deadline to submit is Friday, November 9th.

Q and A with Domico Rodriguez – 1st registered attendee for 2013 NASC Sports Event Symposium

October 18, 2012

We conducted a brief Q&A with Domico Rodriguez, Sports & Events Sales Director for the Rapid City CVB, who was the first officially registered attendee for the 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium to be held in Louisville, KY April 22-25, 2013. Domico shares his thoughts on why he attends the Symposium and how his attendance has benefited his organization.

NASC: How many Symposiums have you attended?
Domico Rodriguez (DR):I have attended three symposiums. The first one I attended was in Columbus and it was my first time in Columbus and it was AMAZING. I will forever remember the activities at Ohio State and meeting the THEN Coach Jim Tressel.

NASC: What is the best piece of advice you’ve learned (from a peer, in an education session, etc.)  at a Symposium that you have attended that you were able to implement at your organization?
DR: A lot of the process of this business and recruiting events is the relationship part. So much of the time it takes a few years of building the relationship to get your foot in the door, be patient and honest with the process.

NASC: What is the biggest selling point for you to attend the Symposium?
DR: The business answer is… First and foremost it is the education aspect of the Symposium, you can learn so much from how other communities work that you can take some of that with you and adjust how you do things in your community.
The sports fan answer is… All of the activities you get to do; as a sports fan these are once in a lifetime opportunities and to get the opportunity to do these things as part of work are priceless. Touring the Ohio State University team locker rooms at the 20120 Symposium in Columbus, OH is an example of these unique opportunities.

NASC: How has your organization benefited from your attendance at the Symposium?
DR: We have been able to start the relationship process with the events and have been able to lay the groundwork for hosting events from rights holders at the Symposium.

NASC: Tell us about some of your past events or upcoming events and how you have been able to improve those events (increase attendance, increase participation, book more rooms, bring more awareness to your community) as a result of your Symposium attendance.
DR: We hosted a first time Amateur Men’s Basketball tournament in our slowest month for hotel rooms, April 2012. The local organizer had never hosted an event but had the idea and because of hearing some of the trials and tribulations from other communities in helping with events I was able to jump in and help the tournament coordinator with so much of the event process. From all aspects of the event from Sponsorship, working with hotels and marketing, I was able to help him. This was my first event getting that involved with as I even officiated during the event and this led our CVB to the discussion as to whether or not to get more involved with events to ensure they are reaching their full potential as many of the event coordinators are volunteers and might not fully understand all that goes into events.

NASC: Anything else you’d like to share?
DR: I truly look forward to the Symposium and out of all of the shows that are out there I still feel this is the best hands down, none of them offer the education aspect that the NASC Symposium does. We cannot take for granted these opportunities because, with the ever changing sports industry, we need to evolve with it.

Working with your Parks and Recreation Departments Effectively

October 17, 2012

We all know how important our Parks and Recreation Departments are for our events.  In many cases they have some of the best facilities in our communities.  However, sometimes it is difficult to get to those facilities.  While many Parks and Recreation Departments are faced with the fiduciary responsibility of making those facilities be revenue generators in the way of tournaments and events, some are solely concerned about the local leagues and constituents, or so it seems.  In the paragraphs that follow, I will give you an insight in to what worked for Bryan-College Station and leave you with some ideas for working with your Parks and Recreation Departments as well.

First, allow me to give you the set-up.  In Bryan-College Station we are blessed to have two cities, so two Parks and Recreation Departments and City Councils.  One of the first things I noticed when I began working for the Convention and Visitors Bureau 8 years ago was that there was not a strong relationship between the CVB and the Parks and Recreation Departments from either city.  So, the first thing that took place was a meeting with the Directors of both cities.  This was key.  I simply explained to them what exactly my goal was in bringing events to the community.  I asked about the leagues and the usage of the facilities.  Since they were first and foremost concerned about the local groups and users, it was a learning experience trying to be creative in explaining how tournaments, while they are wear and tear on fields, could really benefit the local leagues and park users.

The Directors are also an important part of our Advisory Board.  As we are not a stand-alone sports commission, we have an advisory board made up of key facility managers in our community.  Through the interaction with them on this board, the Directors grew to understand the purpose of the CVB and the reasons the events were so important to our community.  They quickly learned that bringing these events in could be great revenue generators for them and community.  These events create more sales tax expenditures in our communities which in turn affect the general funds of the city.  The events would help create more funding for the Parks and Recreation Departments.  In our situation, our Parks and Recreation staffs both had some great experiences in the Amateur Softball Association.  That really helped our cause as they see the impact that large tournaments can make on the community.

Our issue was soccer.  As I stated earlier, our Parks and Recreation Directors’ main concern is the local leagues and local users.  Knowing this, I contacted them to get to the soccer clubs and leagues in our community.  We scheduled a meeting with them and talked about our purpose of bringing these tournaments in to our community.  Our soccer leagues thought we were bringing competitors in that would take field time away from them.  However, during the meeting we explained that we would like these tournaments to be fundraisers for them and we would like to give back to the community by doing so.  The key to getting that going was having the backing of the Parks and Recreation Directors and staffs.

Our business is built on relationships.  It is not just the relationships that we build with event rights holders or suppliers.  It is also about the relationships we build with our own partners in our communities.  We try to meet regularly with our Parks and Recreation Directors for them to share their calendar with us and for us to talk about the possibilities of tournaments and events that we can bring to their facilities.  Once we are all on the same plan and after the same goal, we can accomplish great things.  It all boils down to the key to working with your Parks and Recreation Departments is all about the relationships you establish and maintain.  Once those relationships are in place, you and your community can successfully work together to host and create memorable events for your local groups and the visitors to your community.

Submitted by Kindra Fry, CSEE, SMP
Bryan-College Station CVB |Vice President of Sales & Marketing

CSEE Fall 2012 Module: “Bidding… From A to Z” Recap

October 16, 2012

Dale Neuburger of TSE Consulting facilitated the CSEE Module on “Bidding … from A to Z” held on October 2, 2012 at the Cobo Convention Center Hall in Detroit, MI.  Nearly 140 current and prospective CSEE members were in attendance.  The primary theme of the presentation was the components necessary to develop a winning sports event strategy, including researching, strategizing, campaigning and activating.  In addition, four NASC members (Buddy Wheeler, Janis Schmees , Terry Hasseltine and Sean Krabach) provided input and examples of specific bidding practices they have each utilized to benefit their destinations.  At the conclusion of the module, six individuals were recognized for completing the requirements to earn their CSEE designation.

Fall 2012 CSEE graduates:

Karin Aaron, CSEE, Visit Loudoun
Lindsay Arellano, CSEE, Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
Josh Dill, CSEE, Visit Lubbock, Inc.
Roy Edmondson, CSEE, Team San Jose
Dave Plevich, CSEE, Greater Morgantown Convention & Visitors Bureau
Justin Stine, CSEE, Overland Park Sports Alliance