Posts Tagged ‘sports event industry’

NASC Upcoming Webinars – Register Now

November 18, 2015

Mark your calendars now! We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below, and reserve your spot today!



Tips for Building Community Relationships
Best Practices Webinar
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Building relationships within your community is essential to the success of sporting events you host. From venue support, event management, volunteer recruitment, fundraising and sponsorships, your local community holds the resources that rights holders look for when awarding events. Join Bonny Bernat of Visit Winston-Salem as she shares best practices used in hosting events in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. If you are unable to join us on the 24th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



USA Triathlon

Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Thursday, December 17, 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Register Now

Join Brian D’Amico, National Events Senior Manager, USA Triathlon, as he discusses USA Triathlon and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 17th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).



Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

Contact the Member Services Department if you have any questions.

NASC Playbook – December 2013 Edition Available Now

December 30, 2013
The latest edition of the NASC Playbook is available now.Image
Inside this issue:
  • 2013 Year in Review
  • CSEE/Market Segment Meeting Recap
  • 2014 Board Nominations
  • 2014 Member Awards
  • 22nd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium Preview
The NASC Playbook was created to feature members’ success stories and share industry best practices among the membership.  If your organization has a story to share and would like to be interviewed for a future article, contact Elizabeth Young, Director of Membership and Marketing.
Read the Playbook now.

NASC Playbook – Summer 2013 is now available

July 23, 2013

We are pleased to release our third edition of the NASC Playbook, our quarterly digital publication. was designed to keep our members up-to-date on the latest happenings with your association as well as to share best practices and industry trends that will help you get your share of the sports event industry.

NASC Playbook Summer 2013

Inside this Issue:

– Beth’s Top Ten Tips for Responding to the NASC Symposium RFP
– National Association of Sports Commissions annual symposium celebrates record growth in 2013
– Sports Tourism: A State of the Industry Report
– NASC helps members prepare for the NCAA Championship Bid Process
– NASC Unveils Enhancements to Economic Impact Calculator

View the Summer 2013 NASC Playbook. 

 

If you have stories you’d like to have us feature in a future edition, contact Elizabeth Chaney, Director of Membership and Marketing, at Elizabeth@SportsCommissions.org.

You Get What You Give. What You Put Into Things Is What You Get Out Of Them!

March 8, 2013

Every year when April rolls around I’m totally exhausted and ready for a break from the realities of the work place. I’m tired from all the sending of emails, answering phone calls and labor intensive weekends out working events. To be honest I’m in need of a pick me up, a change or even a vacation, NASC Symposium just so happens to take place at this exact time every year and for me puts the excitement back into my job and gets me fired up for the second half of the year.

This just doesn’t happen you have to go into the Symposium with an open mind and desire to learn something new. The best advice I can give to a new attendee or even a veteran is to be open to new ideas and put yourself out there. Don’t stay in your room and hug the wall! Jump in head first and be willing and ready to walk away after the week is done with that, hey I never thought of doing that or we have to try that back home or even a new contact or two. You can’t be shy when it comes to the Symposium, the networking opportunities are invaluable! Don’t be afraid to walk up to someone and introduce yourself or attend an extra innings lounge by yourself. Chances are the person you are walking up to has been in your shoes before and will welcome you into conversation. The Symposium has so much to offer but if you hide under a rug and don’t embrace everything that is in front of you, you will head home after the week with an inbox full of emails and a phone full of voicemails to catch up on and be right back to where you started.

Don’t be shy and just remember you get what you give. What you put into things is what you’ll get out of them.

Meghan CarmodyMeghan Ziehmer, CTA, is a Michigan State University graduate and proud Spartan. Meghan now serves as the Manager of Sports Events for the Greater Lansing Sports Authority where she has been since October 2009. In her time with the GLSA she has served on the local organizing committee for March Magic Hoopfest, two USA Hockey National Championship events, the 2012 U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships and is currently serving as the Chair for the 2014 Midwestern Sectional Figure Skating Championships.

What NASC Means To Me

November 13, 2012

“I would not have a job in the sports travel industry if it weren’t for the National Association of Sports Commissions!” 

This is a pretty strong statement, but true!  I was hired by the Cedar Rapids Area CVB to pursue convention and meeting business.  After experiencing success for several years, our city began losing its share of this market in the late 1990s when our competition began building shiny, new convention centers.   The largest facility Cedar Rapids could offer the meetings market was a hotel connected to a 6000-seat arena.  During this same time period, our city began developing a new minor league baseball stadium, 20-field soccer complex, and ice arena for the benefit of local residents.

As I was struggling to adjust to the changing landscape of the meetings market, I became aware of the National Association of Sports Commissions through Denny Gann who was President of the Sioux City Sports Commission, one of NASC’s twelve founding organizations.  He gave a series of seminars describing the sports market as a new, emerging market segment.  He explained how hosting a sports event was very different from hosting a convention; and he encouraged membership in a young organization, the National Association of Sports Commissions.

The Cedar Rapids Area CVB became a member of NASC on February 1, 1997, and I attended my first Symposium that April in San Antonio.   I felt like a sponge as I attended one session after another and gained new knowledge from other attendees.  As I absorbed the information shared, I realized that Cedar Rapids could be a legitimate contender for tournaments!

In the fall of 1997 I was ready to bid on my first national tournament.  I prepared my proposal but wanted a more knowledgeable individual to review my work.  Once again NASC came to my rescue!  I asked Denny Gann to mentor me.  As a result of his suggestions, I was able to strengthen my proposal; and Cedar Rapids was awarded the 1999 AAU Taekwondo Youth and Adult National Championship!

The story doesn’t end there, however.  In July of 1998, 1000 athletes and their families spent 5 days in Cedar Rapids competing in the tournament, exploring the area, and spending money at our restaurants, hotels and retail outlets.   Our city council was so pleased with the economic benefits generated, they gave our CVB funding to add a full-time person dedicated to attracting more sports events to our area!

Today NASC continues to be as vibrant and important to me as it was 14 years ago.  Volunteering on committees has given me more insight into the industry and more professional contacts.  I continue to learn from my peers at Symposium and at Market Segment Meetings.  I am very proud of my CSEE and the respect my clients have for the designation.  I find that the appointments with sports organizers at Symposium and the information about their events on the website are invaluable!

I urge you to take advantage of all that the National Association of Sports Commission has to offer!  I promise it will positively enhance your success in this industry!

Mary Lee Malmberg, CSEE
Director of Sports Tourism
Cedar Rapids Area CVB

Mary Lee joined the Cedar Rapids Area Convention & Visitors Bureau in 1989. The bureau’s Sports Tourism Department was established in 2000 and Mary Lee has served as the Director of Sports Tourism since that time. The Sports Tourism Department has helped bring a number of state, regional and national competitions to the Cedar Rapids area including the American Legion World Series and NCAA Division II and III National Wrestling Championships. Mary Lee has attended each NASC Sports Symposium since 1997 and has served on the Member Mentoring Committee since 2001. Mary Lee received her Certified Sports Event Executive certification in April 2006. She has served on NASC’s Board of Directors since 2008.

Room Block in Louisville

November 1, 2012

Every year at the NASC Symposium we have various sessions on how to track hotel pickup.  We all dream of the event where every team stays within their hotel room block and tracking is a breeze. The same can be said of our association’s annual gathering.  We have the opportunity to support NASC by staying at the host hotel (Louisville Marriott Downtown) or the overflow hotel (Hyatt Regency Louisville).  And both hotels are steps from the Kentucky International Convention Center!  Check out the Hotels page on the NASC Symposium website to book your room. See you in Louisville…..

Heath Aucoin, CSEE

Event Manager/Sports Sales Manager

SMG/Jackson Convention Complex

Why It’s Important to Never Burn Bridges

October 25, 2012

It may sound cliché, but in this industry especially, you have to be very careful about not burning any bridges with clients or peers.  The longer you stay in this industry, the more you realize that there is a high retention rate amongst the key players.  Some of them stay in the same organization for years, while others may switch companies or go from a supplier to a buyer.  But just remember that a lot of people in this industry aren’t necessarily in it for the money, they’re here because they have a genuine passion for the industry and their unique skills have allowed them to sustain a successful career.  Each of you can probably think of a handful of competitors that you go up against time and again.  It’s worth asking yourself, how well do I treat those rivals?  Do I avoid them or am I cordial and friendly with them?  If that person turned into a potential client someday, would they trust me enough to call me for help?

A few years ago I was working for a different CVB, and we made the short list for a large youth hockey tournament.  We were bidding against an intra-state rival CVB.  I knew their sports guy pretty well, as we both attended the NASC Symposium for several years, and we were always friendly with each other.   As we met prior to this bid opportunity, we both made a conscious effort to wish each other good luck and offer to help each other out on future bid opportunities.  I was sincere with my words of encouragement and a few years later, I realized that he was too.

Two years later, I accepted a position for Meet Minneapolis and found myself having a lot more venues to sell and was in need of new clients to help fill the funnel.  Then one day, I received a call from that same rival, letting me know that he had recently left the CVB world to start a career as a third party planner for sports groups.  It made perfect sense for him because he had such a vast knowledge of clients that needed housing help.  And best of all, he wanted to work with me to book some business!  Since that day, we’ve booked several groups together with significant room nights.

So when you’re at the NASC Symposium, don’t forget about the value of networking with your peers, even your competitors.  NASC does a really good job of allowing time for you to interact with your fellow attendees.  Try not to get caught up in only talking to “clients” because often times, your peers can provide valuable information that may help you someday.  Plus, you never know when a rival might become one of your best clients!

Matt Meunier
National Account Executive
Meet Minneapolis

Q and A with Domico Rodriguez – 1st registered attendee for 2013 NASC Sports Event Symposium

October 18, 2012

We conducted a brief Q&A with Domico Rodriguez, Sports & Events Sales Director for the Rapid City CVB, who was the first officially registered attendee for the 21st annual NASC Sports Event Symposium to be held in Louisville, KY April 22-25, 2013. Domico shares his thoughts on why he attends the Symposium and how his attendance has benefited his organization.

NASC: How many Symposiums have you attended?
Domico Rodriguez (DR):I have attended three symposiums. The first one I attended was in Columbus and it was my first time in Columbus and it was AMAZING. I will forever remember the activities at Ohio State and meeting the THEN Coach Jim Tressel.

NASC: What is the best piece of advice you’ve learned (from a peer, in an education session, etc.)  at a Symposium that you have attended that you were able to implement at your organization?
DR: A lot of the process of this business and recruiting events is the relationship part. So much of the time it takes a few years of building the relationship to get your foot in the door, be patient and honest with the process.

NASC: What is the biggest selling point for you to attend the Symposium?
DR: The business answer is… First and foremost it is the education aspect of the Symposium, you can learn so much from how other communities work that you can take some of that with you and adjust how you do things in your community.
The sports fan answer is… All of the activities you get to do; as a sports fan these are once in a lifetime opportunities and to get the opportunity to do these things as part of work are priceless. Touring the Ohio State University team locker rooms at the 20120 Symposium in Columbus, OH is an example of these unique opportunities.

NASC: How has your organization benefited from your attendance at the Symposium?
DR: We have been able to start the relationship process with the events and have been able to lay the groundwork for hosting events from rights holders at the Symposium.

NASC: Tell us about some of your past events or upcoming events and how you have been able to improve those events (increase attendance, increase participation, book more rooms, bring more awareness to your community) as a result of your Symposium attendance.
DR: We hosted a first time Amateur Men’s Basketball tournament in our slowest month for hotel rooms, April 2012. The local organizer had never hosted an event but had the idea and because of hearing some of the trials and tribulations from other communities in helping with events I was able to jump in and help the tournament coordinator with so much of the event process. From all aspects of the event from Sponsorship, working with hotels and marketing, I was able to help him. This was my first event getting that involved with as I even officiated during the event and this led our CVB to the discussion as to whether or not to get more involved with events to ensure they are reaching their full potential as many of the event coordinators are volunteers and might not fully understand all that goes into events.

NASC: Anything else you’d like to share?
DR: I truly look forward to the Symposium and out of all of the shows that are out there I still feel this is the best hands down, none of them offer the education aspect that the NASC Symposium does. We cannot take for granted these opportunities because, with the ever changing sports industry, we need to evolve with it.

CSEE Fall 2012 Module: “Bidding… From A to Z” Recap

October 16, 2012

Dale Neuburger of TSE Consulting facilitated the CSEE Module on “Bidding … from A to Z” held on October 2, 2012 at the Cobo Convention Center Hall in Detroit, MI.  Nearly 140 current and prospective CSEE members were in attendance.  The primary theme of the presentation was the components necessary to develop a winning sports event strategy, including researching, strategizing, campaigning and activating.  In addition, four NASC members (Buddy Wheeler, Janis Schmees , Terry Hasseltine and Sean Krabach) provided input and examples of specific bidding practices they have each utilized to benefit their destinations.  At the conclusion of the module, six individuals were recognized for completing the requirements to earn their CSEE designation.

Fall 2012 CSEE graduates:

Karin Aaron, CSEE, Visit Loudoun
Lindsay Arellano, CSEE, Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
Josh Dill, CSEE, Visit Lubbock, Inc.
Roy Edmondson, CSEE, Team San Jose
Dave Plevich, CSEE, Greater Morgantown Convention & Visitors Bureau
Justin Stine, CSEE, Overland Park Sports Alliance

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 25, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.

What NASC Membership Means to Me

September 24, 2012

If you are like most of us, when you acquired your position you also acquired a “membership” in NASC because your CVB or Sports Commission was already a member of NASC.  And, quite possibly, you probably knew little about the NASC or what an impact it could have on your job and your career.

You are part of a rapidly growing industry-the sports tourism travel industry-and the rules we operate by are changing almost daily.  How do you stay ahead of your competition? How do you identify and act on trends when they occur?  How do you go about your “business as usual” when the “usual” keeps changing?

It’s a tough job and sometimes it’s easy to get the feeling that you’re overwhelmed with change and are having to go it alone in your job.

Well, if you haven’t thoroughly studied the NASC website, if you haven’t attended the Market Segment meetings, haven’t yet attended a Symposium, or become involved in the CSEE program, then you couldn’t know that many of the answers to your problems lie as close as your NASC  membership.

The longer you are involved in NASC the more you’ll come to realize that you’re not alone.  The problems you encounter are the same problems others in our industry face and oftentimes, the best way to resolve the problems is to communicate with our peers.  The NASC certainly provides this opportunity through all of its programming services.

I have often said, I have learned more about this industry and learned more about my job through my association with the NASC than with just about anything else I have done throughout my career.  The NASC has provided me the opportunity to establish relationships with rights holders, with event owners, NGB’s, and with my fellow peers within the industry-and we all know it’s all about our relationships.

I would certainly encourage you, whether you are a newcomer to the industry, or a seasoned veteran, to let your NASC help you become a significant contributor to this industry.  And I would also encourage you to get involved with the NASC.  Serving on committees, contributing at market segment meetings, participating in our webinars, and attending and being a part of the Symposium will help you build those relationships that are so crucial to success.

We all have growing pains as we go through life, the NASC can help ease those pains and make us successful.

 

Jim Dietz, Director of Sports
Columbus Indiana Visitors Center

jdietz@columbus.in.us

Jim served on the Board of Directors of the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center (CIVC) for seven years and as an officer for three of those years. Jim currently serves as Director of Sports Tourism for the CIVC and oversees over 50 annual athletic events in Columbus. Jim has been involved in the hospitality industry for over 30 years having owned and operated his own restaurants in Indiana and Illinois. A former high school teacher and coach, he has also held management positions in a Fortune 500 company and has served on numerous boards including the Western Illinois University Foundation Board and the Western Illinois University Athletic Board.  Jim is currently serving on the NASC Board of Directors and enrolled in the Certified Sports Event Executive (CSEE) Program.  He is the co-chair of the NASC Mentoring Committee.