Posts Tagged ‘sports events’

Is Your Organization Covered—for Anything?

March 21, 2016

The idea of crisis plans for your team, event or venue is to try to think of anything and everything that can happen, and make sure you have a correct response to every scenario you can come up with. auction-gavel-2

But too often, no one takes into consideration 1) demanding parents and 2) litigation at the drop of a gavel.

When his 16-year-old son didn’t get the most valuable player award, Michel Croteau didn’t get mad, he tried to get even. He hired a lawyer and sued his son’s youth hockey league to the tune of more than $200,000. Croteau claimed his son Steve should have been the MVP since he had the most goals and assists in the league. When he didn’t win, daddy claimed that Steve was so embarrassed, he wanted to quit hockey.

This isn’t an isolated case. In the year the Croteau lawsuit was filed, 2013, parents filed more than 200 non-injury-related sports lawsuits against coaches, leagues and school districts in the United States, according to Gil Fried, a University of New Haven professor specializing in sports law.

But wait, there’s more.

The Butzke family sued the Comsewogue, N.Y., school district because their eighth-grade daughter was taken off the varsity high school soccer team.

The Branco family took legal action against the Washington Township, N.J., school district after their son, David, was cut from the junior varsity basketball team.

The Rubin family sued California’s New Haven Unified School District for $1.5 million because their son got kicked off the varsity basketball team.

Marc Martinez sued his son’s baseball coach, John Emme, twice, and both times the suit was thrown out. It all surrounded the fact that Emme removed J.D. Martinez from the varsity roster, and dad claimed Emme did it for spite since Martinez the elder had complained to the school district that Emme was having his son throw too much. Coach Emme then countersued Martinez, a move Emme’s lawyer said was as much about Martinez as it was to send a message to parents around the country.

Most everyone has insurance to cover injury, weather, and other fairly predictable problems. Litigation is a growing issue, though, for many sports organizations, especially youth sports. Make sure you have a plan (and an attorney) in place that can help you out, in case there’s a case brought against you.

NASC Upcoming Best Practices and Event Webinars – Register Now

September 29, 2015

We have a great line-up of both Best Practices Webinars and Event Webinars that you won’t want to miss. Check out the schedule below and reserve your spot today!


Sugar Bert Boxing Promotions
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Monday, October 5, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Bert Wells, CEO, Sugar Bert Boxing Promotions and his team as they discuss Sugar Bert Boxing Promotions and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 5th, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).


USA Archery
Event Webinar Sponsored by MGM Resorts International
Monday, October 19, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Sheri Rhodes, National Events Manager, USA Archery, as she discusses USA Archery and what it takes to land their events. There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions. If you are unable to join us on the 19th, remember you can download the webinar recording from ourwebinar archives page (login required).


Prospecting for Events
Best Practices Webinar
Thursday, October 22, 2015
2:00pm – 3:00pm ET

Register Now

Join Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director, NASC, as he discusses best practices for prospecting events. Don will share his top methods for sourcing events, as well as prospecting opportunities and strategies. If you are unable to join us on the 22nd, remember you can download the webinar recording from our webinar archives page (login required).


Webinar Archives

If you’ve missed any of our recent webinars, or would like to view them again, visit our Best Practices Webinar Archives or our Event Webinar Archives.

National Association of Sports Commissions Announces Major Sponsors for 2015 Annual NASC Symposium

April 23, 2015

CINCINNATI (April 23, 2015) – The National Association of Sports Commissions announced today its major sponsors for the 2015 NASC Symposium to be held in Milwaukee next week from April 27-30 where a record turnout of 925 sports events industry professionals will be in attendance.

Elite and Diamond sponsors include: VISIT Milwaukee, West Michigan Sports Commission, Louisiana Association of CVBs, Foley, Alabama, Sports Tourism Complex, Michigan Sports, TEAM Maryland, Mobile Sports Authority, TEAM Kentucky and Visit Greenville, SC.

Foley Sports Tourism Complex will sponsor the Keynote Luncheon, TEAM Maryland will support the Sports Marketplace Aisle Signage, VISIT Milwaukee will host the Welcome Reception, and West Michigan Sports Commission will host the Closing Celebration. Mobile Sports Authority is sponsoring the Countdown Clocks in the NASC Marketplace. TEAM Kentucky is sponsoring Extra Innings on Monday and Tuesday and Visit Greenville, SC is sponsoring Extra Innings on Wednesday.

Grand Rapids and the West Michigan Sports Commission will serve as the host for the 2016 NASC Symposium, Monday, April 4 through Thursday, April 7 in downtown Grand Rapids.

“We are grateful to our sponsors who continue to support the NASC Symposium,” said Don Schumacher, executive director of the National Association of Sports Commissions. “With their sponsorship, the NASC can continue to present the industry’s leading education and networking event for sports event professionals.”

The NASC Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals.

For more information, visit www.sportscommissions.org/symposium.

When Society and Sports Collide

January 19, 2015

In the wake of the social unrest we’ve seen in Ferguson, Cleveland and New York, athletes have used their national platforms to express their opinions on the incidents—see the St. Louis Rams’ players coming out for team introductions with the “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” pose.

This expression has reached basketball, where professional and college players alike have worn “I Can’t Breathe” shirts, signifying the last words of Eric Gardner, the New York man who died after an officer put him in a chokehold.I cant breathe

And now, a high school basketball tournament in Northern California has been included in the conversation, after a school scheduled to play in the tournament was disinvited because of concerns its players would wear “I Can’t Breathe” shirts during warm-ups.

The athletic director at Mendocino High School was told that neither the boy’s nor the girl’s team would be allowed to participate in the tournament if they wore the shirts.

The boys were reinstated after all but one player agreed not to wear the shirt. Too few girl players agreed to not wear the shirts and were not allowed to play.

No surprise here: The parent of the one boy who decided to sit out the holiday tournament has taken the issue to the American Civil Liberties Union. In a written statement, the principal of the host school, Fort Bragg High School, said the school administrators respected the Mendocino teams “for paying attention to what is going on in the world around them” and that the shirts were being banned as a security precaution.

This isn’t the first, and won’t be the last, time where the world of amateur and youth sports will collide with First Amendment rights and the desire of young athletes to express themselves.

Have you run into similar issues with your events or teams? If so how did you handle the issue and what advice would you have other rights holders or event planners on how to deal with the issue? Give us your thoughts on our NASC Facebook page. We always welcome comments on best practices.

A New Look at Old Venues

December 30, 2014

The week between Christmas and New Year’s Day is crammed with all kinds of sporting events, not the least of which is the New Year’s traditional 2015 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic, featuring hockey (Chicago and Washington) playing outdoors, this time at the Washington Nationals stadium.

The outdoor series started as a made-for-TV New Year’s tradition in 2008, and since then has become one of the most popular and most-watched NHL games of the season. It’s spurred a similar Canadian series, the NHL Heritage Classic, and has NHL teams asking to either host, or take part in the series. 2015-WinterClassic-Rink-Build

These so-called “gimmick games” aren’t anything new, but they do emphasize the point that sometimes a change of venue can give new life, and bring new fans, to any sport. Basketball has been played on aircraft carriers and on the stage at Radio City Music Hall, even outside in the desert in the dead of winter. Collegiate hockey (as well as the NHL) has been played at the “Big House” of Michigan Stadium.

Golf balls have been hit off decks and docks and tennis has been played on the top of skyscrapers (as promotional stunts); Wrigley Field and Fenway Park have been the hosts for college football games in recent years and Yankee Stadium holds the annual Pinstripe Bowl.

Don’t have a beach to host the pro volleyball tour? No problem. For the AVP stop in Cincinnati two years ago, sand was trucked into the middle of the street and bleachers were set up on the sidewalks and voila, sand volleyball!

All this is to say, don’t hesitate to look at your facilities in different ways for different uses. Several years ago when the organizers of the Las Vegas Bowl weren’t able to use the stadium’s suites for hospitality, they took the end-zone space, put up a tent, brought in lounge chairs and big-screen televisions and created their own field-level exclusive hospitality area which became even more popular than the traditional suite box.

By looking at venues with a new, creative eye, sometimes you can make an event an even more exciting experience and bring in new fans at the same time. Make 2015 the year of maximizing your venues for the best experience possible.

NASC Best Practices Webinar on Defining the Roles of Sports Commissions and Convention & Visitors Bureaus Scheduled for Tuesday, August 26

August 14, 2014

419935_385667831461241_204296396265053_1503044_232626335_nAre you wondering whether your community should develop a sports commission? Maybe you find yourself asking, what is the difference between a sports commission and a convention and visitors bureau? What about funding– how do you raise the money needed to fund a sports commission?

Join Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director, National Association of Sports Commissions as he discussed the difference between a sports commission and a convention and visitors bureau, as well as sustainable funding sources to help keep your organization alive.
If you missed our recent video blog on Defining the Roles of Sports Commissions and Convention & Visitors Bureaus, be sure to check it out prior to August 26th, as Don will dive further into detail during the webinar!
About Don: Don Schumacher, CSEE has 50 years of experience in the fields of communications, family entertainment, theme park marketing and operations, arena and stadium marketing and operations, event management, sports marketing and facilities consultation. For the past 30 years he has focused his activities on the sports event travel market and has consulted with more than fifty cities on strategies to increase their share of this market.

NASC Announces 2014 Member Award Winners

April 3, 2014

Kansas City award photoThe NASC Member Awards signify outstanding work in the areas of sports events, marketing and promotion. All entries were reviewed by a panel of peers in the association and judged based on the criteria listed for each category. Winners were then announced at the NASC Symposium in Oklahoma City, where more than 800 sports tourism professionals were in attendance.

Award winners include:

  • Inaugural Sports Event Professional of the Year award, Ron Radigonda, recently retired as head of the Amateur Softball Harris County Houston award photoAssociation/USA Softball
  • Locally Created Event of the Year, under $200,000 budget, Hampton Roads Sports Commission
  • Locally Created Event of the Year, $200,000 budget and above, Kansas City Sports Commission
  • Marketing Campaign of the Year, $200,00 budget and above, Round Rock CVB
  • Sports Commission of the Year, under $200,000 budget, Erie Sports Commission
  • Sports Commission of the Year, $200,000 budget and above, Harris County-Houston Sports Commission

For more information on the NASC Member Awards program, visit: www.sportscommissions.org/About/Member-Awards.

Don’t Depend on Ticket Sales for a Successful Event

January 20, 2014

The first weekend of NFL playoffs saw down-to-the-wire, thrilling games in three of the four contests. It also saw something unusual – a scramble to sell out the first-round playoff games.

In Indianapolis, Cincinnati and, of all places, Green Bay, clubs scrambled, pleaded and cajoled their fan bases to buy tickets to assure sellouts and thus avoid the NFL mandated media market blackouts. To no one’s surprise, enough corporate buyers turned out at the last minute to assure the games would be shown in the home teams’ market.

If nothing else, the scramble for a sellout, and the subsequent publicity surrounding the difficulty to sell tickets, has shone a light on the now-antiquated NFL blackout rule. In fact, Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown has called on the Federal Communications Commission to eliminate the Sports Blackout Rule, which was instituted in 1973.

Now, many believe that rule has outlived its usefulness, mainly because the NFL now enjoys the richest television contracts in sports—in 2011 the NFL announced a nine-year extension to its TV packages with Fox, NBC and CBS, under which, according to Forbes, the networks are expected to pay about 60% more than under the old contract.

The new deal, which kicks in after the 2013 season, means the networks will pay about $3 billion a year to show games. Throw in deals with the NFL Network, DirectTV and Westwood One, among others, and NFL teams will split nearly $7 billion in media money per year starting in 2014. That’s more than $200 million per team before a ball hits the turf, no matter who’s blacked out where.

The second reason the blackout rule has seen its time come and go: Ticket sales are an archaic measure of fan support.

It has long been the belief, if a city’s fans won’t buy lots of tickets, they must not be loyal fans. In this day of social media connections, 70” flat screen televisions and RedZone updates, just the opposite is true. Fans are SO involved (especially those who play in fantasy leagues) they want to know what everyone is doing in the league, not just their own team. They’re bigger fans than ever, not just of their team, but of the sport overall.

So what does that mean for an event that you want to bring to your region? Just this: Yes, you want people to attend, and if you bring in a sport or an event that has lots of local participants, all the better to bring in attendees and volunteers. But don’t think you’re going to reach your budget goals by selling $5 tickets to a soccer tournament.

You might have one of the top golf participation areas in the nation, but hold a junior golf tournament in your city and you might find out that you can’t sell tickets. It’s not that people don’t love to watch golf, they love to PLAY golf – usually at the same times your junior tournament is being held.

Or maybe you want people to sample your event—watch youth lacrosse for the first time, for example. What better way to encourage people to stop by than to offer free admission.

During the deep freeze of January 2014, the University of Cincinnati women’s basketball program offered free admission to its game with Rutgers, with complimentary hot chocolate and coffee (courtesy of Coach Jamelle Elliott) for those who braved sub-freezing temperatures to come out. The attendance that night was almost twice what a midweek game usually averages.

The bottom line is, the bottom line. Sponsor support is the life blood of your event. Get your costs covered by sponsorship, and don’t roll the dice on ticket sales. In fact, many youth events have free admission—or tickets at family-friendly prices.

The NFL blackout rule is as dated as event organizers depending on ticket sales to pay for your event. Ticket sales are not a measure of support for the sport. The event world knows that—the NFL needs to realize that as well.

Jackie

Jackie Reau

Game Day Communications

700 West Pete Rose Way

Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office

(513) 708-5822, mobile

(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com

www.gamedaypr.com

LinkedIn: JackieReau

Facebook: JackieReau

Twitter:@JackieReau

Submit an Entry For Member Awards

January 2, 2014

The annual NASC Member Awards recognize the achievements of Active category members in the previous calendar year. For the 2014 Member Awards, activities, events, marketing campaigns, web strategies, etc. must have occurred in 2013.

“We first established the awards program in 2002 to recognize the good work that our members conduct in their communities. They are all making large contributions to their communities through the economic impact of their events and the leadership and expertise they provide,”  said Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director.

Award Categories

Click on the each award category to view judging criteria and submission guidelines.

Budget Categories

  • Under $200,000
  • $200,000 and above

About budget categories: Each award category is divided into budget categories based on your organization’s total annual budget. Total annual budget for sports commissions is operating budget.  Total annual budget for sports tourism organizations is total sports budget.

Submitting An Entry

All Active members are welcome to enter a submission for one or more award categories. Entries are due by Friday, January 31, 2014 at 11:59pm ET.

Submit an Entry.

Contact Elizabeth Chaney Young, Director of Membership and Marketing, with any questions about Member Awards.

Register Now for Upcoming Event Webinars

November 26, 2013

Recently, many of our Rights Holder members have presented Event Webinars to more thoroughly share information about their events and requirements to bid with destinations interested in hosting events. The opportunity to host an event webinar is a benefit of membership and a unique way to reach numerous cities simultaneously.

Upcoming Event Webinar schedule:

  • Monday, December 2nd at 2pm ET – USA Weightlifting (5 events available for bid) – Register Now
  • Tuesday, December 10th at 2pm ET – National Senior Games Association (1 event available for bid) – Register Now

If you are interested in hosting an event webinar to discuss your RFP and bid requirements or have any questions, please contact Elizabeth Chaney Young, Director of Membership & Marketing, at Elizabeth@SportsCommissions.org.

Visit the webinar archives page in case you missed any of our recent webinars. Check out the infographics below to view the Q&A sessions from recent event webinars:

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What my membership in the NASC means to me

April 29, 2013

I had some time to reflect on the Symposium on my short drive home last Thursday, and one thing among many was pretty evident—-there is a passion for sports and sporting events like never before!

This brings me to the reason of this message to all of you. I wanted to pass along some thoughts on “What my Membership in the NASC means to me”? I really don’t know where to start with this other than the fact that it is OUR Association, and while we have some great leadership and staff at the National level, it is only as good as what we put into it. I have had the pleasure these past several years to serve on the Mentoring Committee, and as a committee we have had the opportunity to meet and talk with our new members and educate them on the value of the great decision that they and the organization that they belong to made by joining the NASC. How rewarding it has been for me help and assist someone as they venture into this exciting field of Sports and Events! Our new members are our future, and as the Symposium hit a new milestone with over 750 people in attendance this past week, we can only hope that we continue to see steady growth in the years to come. We can achieve this by offering strong educational programs, CSEE Certification, and  an outstanding Symposium each year.

If you are not active serving the NASC in some capacity—-Start Now! You would be pleasantly surprised by what you can offer (who would have thought that I would be writing this note to you now) and your event experience could help another member and its Organization save some time and effort on an Event they may be working on. There are many Committees that are available to serve on and you could be a valuable addition bringing in new ideas and thoughts. Learn more about committees and volunteer opportunities here.

If you are not enrolled in the CSEE Certification—Consider it! Expertise in any field is the benchmark for how you are perceived in your trade. Continuing education is important and what better place to receive that than in a CSEE Module. Educated and updated by the best in our field, that is what you can expect at each Module. Learn more about CSEE here.

If you are not looking at the website on a regular basis—Do it! Great updated information is only a “click” away. Make the website a favorite on your Internet menu and review it often.

If you have questions reach out to someone and find the answer. If you met someone this past week I am sure that they would be happy to speak with you. Not sure if that is where you want to start—call the National Office, they will have ideas and may recommend someone to call.

Thanks again to Louisville for hosting an outstanding Symposium!

Yours in Sports,

Ron Eifert, CSEE, Sr. Sales/Sports Manager

Dayton/Montgomery County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Direct: 937.226.8284

E-mail: reifert@daytoncvb.net

Website: http://www.daytoncvb.com